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For Those Of You Who Like To Carry A Gun.

Le Loup

Rüdiger Nehberg
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I am not sure if I have posted this before or not, but there is probably no harm done if I have. For me going bush means carrying a gun, I always have done & always will. As most of you will know I prefer primitive technology, especially when it comes to long term wilderness living/survival. So here is a list of the reasons why I prefer to carry flintlocks.
Regards, Keith.
FLINTLOCK RIFLE 006.jpg
.32 caliber flintlock rifle with double set triggers.

Advantages of a Flintlock Muzzle-loader.
1) Ammo is less expensive than a modern equivalent caliber firearm.
2) The smoothbore is very versatile, being able to digest round ball, bird shot, & buckshot, or any combination of two of these (can also use minies).
3) The fusil is lighter to carry than a modern equivalent sized gun.
4) You can vary the load if needs be.
5) The smoothbore will digest other projectiles besides lead.
6) Lead can be retrieved from downed game & remoulded with a simple mould & lead ladle. This means that you can carry less lead, & more of the lighter gunpowder.
7) You can make your own gunpowder.
8) You can use the lock to make fire without the need for gunpowder.
9) You can use gunpowder for gunpowder tinder fire lighting if needs be.
10) IF the lock should malfunction (these are very robust & it is not likely) you can easily repair it if you are carrying a few spare springs & a few simple tools.
11) If you do not have any spare parts & the lock malfunctions, you can easily convert it to a tinderlock or matchlock & continue using it.
12) You do not need a reloader, brass shells, caps, or primers. The latter have been known to break down in damp conditions or if they are stored for too long.
13) Wadding for ball or shot is available from natural plant materials or homemade leather or rawhide.
14) Less chance of being affected by future ammunition control legislation.
15) Gunpowder is easily obtainable providing you have a muzzle-loader registered in your name regardless of caliber (only NSW is looking at this legislation at present).
16) A .32 caliber flintlock rifle is more powerful than a .22 rimfire, less expensive to feed, more accurate over a greater distance, able to take small & medium sized game, & other than not being able to use shot (unless it is smoothbore), it has all the attributes of the other flintlocks.
17) Damage from a .62 caliber-.75 caliber pistol or long arm is in the extreme. Wounded prey is unlikely to escape.
18) By using buck & ball you are unlikely to miss your target. This load is capable of taking out more than one target.
19) There is less kick-back to a muzzle-loading gun.
20) Antique Flintlock muzzle-loading guns do not require a license, registration, or a permit to purchase in NSW Australia.

Fusil 17-6-2016 002.jpg
.62 caliber/20 gauge smoothbore flintlock fusil with 42 inch barrel.
Pistol 2.jpg
.70 caliber smoothbore flintlock pistol with a left hand lock.
 

oncedisturbed

Les Hiddins
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Unfortunately in most case in Australia, it's hard being allowed to carry a firearm of any style when going out bush, especially Western Australia unless you're on private property and even then legally you can't carry a pistol or revolver


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theslothman

Russell Coight
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An R licence will give you the ability to carry in a heap of State forests in NSW. After booking etc 1st of course. Us and Vic have a good set up in that regard.
Im similar to you Le Loup. Ill have a rifle or bow with me on most of my bush trips. even if im not going out purposefully to hunt. Only Ive gotten lazy and take modern centre or rim fire rifles. lol
If my pretty half comes with me i leave the guns at home. Shes far more of a hippy than I and doesnt like the dead animals. Shell eat them though.
Next week im going bush for a few days solo but not taking anything with me. Just a shanghai maybe. I plan to do some whittling projects.
 

Bloffy13

Jon Muir
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Unfortunately in most case in Australia, it's hard being allowed to carry a firearm of any style when going out bush, especially Western Australia unless you're on private property and even then legally you can't carry a pistol or revolver


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@oncedisturbed: Just checked out the Western Australian Firearms Act 1973. Section 8 Exemptions from licensing requirements
(1) No licence under this Act is required —....
(mc) by a person who is in possession of, or carries, but does not use, an antique mechanism firearm;
(2) In subsection (1) —
“antique mechanism firearm” means a muzzle loading firearm (including a percussion lock handgun that is muzzle loading) manufactured before 1900 that uses black powder to propel a shot, bullet, or other missile except that it does not include a breech loading firearm, a firearm with revolving chambers or barrels, or a cannon;

And;
FIREARMS REGULATIONS 1974 - SCHEDULE 3

[r. 6A]

Division 1 — Category A
2 . Category B firearms

Each firearm described in the Table is a category B firearm.

Table

Sub‑category

Description


B1

a muzzle loading firearm (except a handgun)

B2.1

a single shot centre fire rifle

B2.2

a double barrel centre fire rifle

B2.3

a repeating centre fire rifle

B3.1

a combination firearm, not of category C or D, made up of a shotgun and a rifle at least one of which would individually be of category B

B3.2

a rifle combination, not of category C or D, made up of rifles at least one of which would individually be of category B

3 . Genuine need test for category B

To satisfy the genuine need test for category B the applicant must satisfy the Commissioner that a firearm of category A would be inadequate or unsuitable for the purpose for which the firearm is required.

[Clause 3 inserted in Gazette 31 Aug 2010 p. 4185.]
I couldn't see anything that specically said you had to have access to land but I was skimming through a few hundred pages of waffle.
So that's very similar, if not the same, as Le Loup said, from my limited understanding.
Sorry guys. Didn't mean to hijack the thread....
Cheers
Bloffy
 

oncedisturbed

Les Hiddins
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Very true Bloffy but the catch is you must have a licence in order to use them and to purchase the black powder and an appropriate safe that is not part of the safe storing the firearms.

Unfortunately WAPOL have a lot of hoops to jump through to cover these, and normally apply this under a collector's licence, there's currently a massive problem with black powder as the Act allows you to store the black powder in an ammo safe but the Mines Act prohibits storage of it unless in a seperate safe.




"Never under estimate the power of the tap, let it flow through you"
 

oncedisturbed

Les Hiddins
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I'd love to be able to own items like Le Loup has and to be able to use them, they're some beautiful items you've got 😎😎


"Never under estimate the power of the tap, let it flow through you"
 

Le Loup

Rüdiger Nehberg
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I'd love to be able to own items like Le Loup has and to be able to use them, they're some beautiful items you've got ����


"Never under estimate the power of the tap, let it flow through you"
Thank you. I have never had any problems, except with the police officers that do not know the regulations, can't tell an antique from a copy, & don't know the difference between a breech-loader & a muzzle-loader. But there is nothing we can do about ignorant police. I do have two separate safes.
Firearms legislation in Australia is aimed at disarming law abiding citizens, terrorist threat scare tactics have been used to restrict the sale & storage of black powder. We have to learn how we can get what we want working within the law/legislation as it stands. For me, not being able to legally shoot my pistol NOW, is not a problem, just knowing I have it, & knowing that IF the shtf at any time I have the means to protect myself & my family is enough.
Keith.
 
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