Amphibian Finding frogs that stop singing

Dusty Miller

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Not sure this belongs here, but..

I was looking for a frog in the yard today, but every time I got close, it stopped its call. I couldn't tell exactly where it was coming from so I grabbed a piece of pvc tubing (a vacuum cleaner tube also works ok).
By putting one end to an ear to listen (after checking for spiders) and then waving the other end of the tubing around where I could hear the frog, the sound got louder and softer, so I was able to localise the frog to about a 20 cm circle, far better than I could do by ear alone. It was then easier to search the small area to find the frog. The frog seemed much less bothered by the tubing and only occasionally stopped calling, whereas I could not get within a metre without out before the frog went into "silent running". Works for crickets too.
 

Hairyman

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Wonder if this was ever done with a didgeridoo to find noisy sleep
disturbing frogs?
 

Corin

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That is a cool idea! At night we use frog triangulation which works a treat. It requires two torches with pencil beams, and two people to use them. the two people stand at approximately right angles to the sound of the frog, and at the same time turn on the torches pointing in the direction they hear the frog. The frog is almost always where the beams intersect.
 

Dusty Miller

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Cool, have to get the kids to help me with that one.
 

Aussie123

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Those techniques would have been very handy last weekend.

We tried and tried but couldn't see any frogs, but sure could hear them.

I have a lovely audio recording, not sure if it can be uploaded here ?
 

AussiePreppers

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Frog finding can be an art form, especially when looking for the Crinia and Uperoleia types. I hadn't thought of PVC but often cup my hand behind my ear and try to hone in on them that way. Quite often, what you think is a huge frog calling will be as big as one of your fingernails. If you hear them calling on wet grassy ground, they are often found at the base of a tuft of grass. The more rain, the more they will continue calling when disturbed. If it's not raining much or it's a little chilly, they will quite often shut up and be difficult to find. Gently peeling back the grass in the area you can hear them can help. Once they scurry away, it's best to leave them be and move on to another call. Your headtorch will often shut them up as well. Once i've narrowed their area down, i'll turn to the side for better sound and that doubles to shine your light away from the area they are in.

While out hunting frogs to photograph I often see owls up in the trees focusing their heads on different calls, just as I am trying to do. The things i've seen while out alone in torrential rain in the middle of nowhere...
 
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