Ferro rod storage

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Russell Coight
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Hope everyone's doing well,

I picked up a ferro rod to practice with, but I've noticed it comes with fertility and cancer warnings all over it o_O

Just made me wonder how everyone stores these when not in use? Do you clean them up after using them in the field, or just throw them back in your bag?

Cheers,
Rob
 

Thrud

Richard Proenneke
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Sure that's not a uranium rod from a decommissioned nuclear reactor?đŸ¤ª
 

Le Loup

RĂ¼diger Nehberg
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Hope everyone's doing well,

I picked up a ferro rod to practice with, but I've noticed it comes with fertility and cancer warnings all over it o_O

Just made me wonder how everyone stores these when not in use? Do you clean them up after using them in the field, or just throw them back in your bag?

Cheers,
Rob
Get yourself & steel & tinderbox Boogers. More sustainable method.
A small selection of fire steels & salacious rocks.REDUCED.JPGTinder in box REDUCED.jpgTinderbox & steels 009 SMALL.jpgfire bag 009 REDUCED.jpg
Regards, Keith.
 

Aussie123

Never Alone In The Bush
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I haven't seen a warning, but "ferro" rods contain a mixture of rare earth metals and perhaps some of them require warnings at least in some jurestrictions ?

To answer the question, I keep mine is a ziplock in the pocket of my pack; but I have a small one on my everyday key ring too ...
 

Aussie123

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I thought I should add.

Fero rods need to be kept dry as they will corrode if left or stored in a wet environment.
Yes, I have had one turn to "powder" which was used (i.e. protective coating removed) and stored inside where it was dry.
Perhaps it was just that particular brand, because I have others which haven't corroded

Some people put some clear paint, or nail polish, on the exposed metal to protect it during storage, or I guess if you're somewhere wet.
 

Chigger

Mors Kochanski
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Surprised to read all of this I never knew ferro rods could deterioate. I have one with a rod of magnesium attached to it, never used the magnesium I might add.

Never paid much attention to its storage, the rod has always been kept in a dry place and the last time I saw it was in perfect condition, albiet a bit worn from use.

Years ago used the ferro rod for firelighting on occassion however have long, long moved over to traditional firelighting with flint and steel.
 

Requiem

Malcolm Douglas
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Salt water appears to be particularly damaging, which would make sense given the mixture of metals. I usually give mine a light coating of lip balm which I carry with me anyway.
 

Wave Man

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I've been storing all mine just straight in my fire kits (belt pouches mainly buy some are various pocket organizers) and have had zero issues with oxidization yet. I just make sure they aren't wet before they go into the pouch.

Concerning Kieth's suggestion of flint and steel and a tinderbox, I agree long term conditionally.
The condition is if you have easy access to flint (or quarztite) so if you can easily find hard rock and know how to get sharp edges on that rock and have developed you skill with flint and steel to the point of easily get embers in various weather conditions then yes flint and steel is a viable option.
One thing flint and steel and tinderbox is a reasonably expensive option. A good kit with brass tinder box is $70 (from Viceroy), comes with a "C" striker, flint, char cloth and brass tinder box. Add in a few more flints and you are at about $85.
For $85 you could get 10 5"x 1/2" ferro rods.
 

Aussie123

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… One thing flint and steel and tinderbox is a reasonably expensive option. ...
Expensive if you are trying to recreate a "historic" look and feel.
If you're just after experience with sparking steel, then there are much cheaper options available ...

I admit I love the look and feel of a traditional setup, but a cheap, homemade setup will teach you a lot with minimal expense
 

Wave Man

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Expensive if you are trying to recreate a "historic" look and feel.
If you're just after experience with sparking steel, then there are much cheaper options available ...

I admit I love the look and feel of a traditional setup, but a cheap, homemade setup will teach you a lot with minimal expense
completely true mate. The one thing is the brass tinderbox. The cheapest option I have found is $39+$9 postage (again from Viceroy). Though agreed you can do it again on the cheap and use an 'Altoids' tin if you like but the brass type tins are period correct and so much nicer IMHO.

I also agree you can do it on the cheap and learn as far as flint and steel goes, all except the flints (though they really are cheap like $7 for one good piece of flint) a old file usually works just fine and I have shown that in video.
 

Boogers

Russell Coight
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I ended up ordering a flint and steel, curious to try it out. I'm guessing the flint breaks after some time? I have zero knowledge on rocks so I wouldn't know how to spot them, one more thing to learn.
 

Wave Man

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unless you live in a specific place in South Australia you aren't going to find flint here in Australia mate, it's very, very rare here. There are other viable stones that work, quartzite for example but as you say unless you know what you are looking for it is better to buy these things.

Just be careful mate, flint and steel is addictive, well it was for me.
 

odgens

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Yes, I have had one turn to "powder" which was used (i.e. protective coating removed) and stored inside where it was dry.
Perhaps it was just that particular brand, because I have others which haven't corroded

Some people put some clear paint, or nail polish, on the exposed metal to protect it during storage, or I guess if you're somewhere wet.
I just had this happen to me, pulled out an old hunting pack which hadnt been used in years and the ferro rod (light my fire scout) has started to powder and was badly pitted....still works but made me think twice about what ill need to do when storing long term. Interesting my 1/2 rods from Aliexpress are fine (same age but kept in a draw)
 

Aussie123

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I ended up ordering a flint and steel, curious to try it out. I'm guessing the flint breaks after some time? I have zero knowledge on rocks so I wouldn't know how to spot them, one more thing to learn.
There are lots of quartz, quartzites and other suitable rocks in Vic.
You should be able to find some once you know what you're looking for.

... and the problem is to know what you're looking for.

I'm not sure which corner of the state you're in, but the best advice I can give you is
to find a creek or river bed with lots of different rocks in it, and start testing them.

Sort out the different types you can see.
Try and crack them open to see what they are like inside and how they fracture

Test dry rocks which form sharp, hard edges along the breaks ... and see what works
 

Boogers

Russell Coight
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Thanks I'll keep an eye out for them this weekend, rocks are something I honestly have no knowledge on. There's a few dirt tracks that are rock gardens in sections, but I'm not sure they are natural, I always figured they were dumped there to help cars during muddy seasons.
 

Wave Man

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I just had the chance to try quartz with my flint and steel and wasn't impressed. It is very fragile and chippy, and doesn't produce very good sharp edges like flint so you can't drive sparks as easily.

I would only use quartz if it was my only choice as flint is superior in every way.
 
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