Eye Shine

auscraft

Henry Arthur Readford
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Does anyone have a list of animal night time eye reflection colours?
I know some but it is said "Possum-spotting experts can often tell which species of possum they are looking at simply by their eyeshine colour."
this has gotten me thinking, I know foxes have different colours from Kits and sub adults to Adults.. I also know eye colours in certain species change the reflective colours and so on.
So I am interested in compiling a list of colours also need to know light source either old type light or L.E.D


P.S please keep it on Australian Wildlife it should include feral species
 
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kiwibro

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From my experience brush tails have a intense red eyeshine. Like demons. Only fluffy.
LED's were used in the making of these findings.
 

Aussie123

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Very interesting topic. There seems to be lots of bits and pieces of info around, but I couldn't see a comprehensive list. I have seen an animal ID chart with (along with the "normal" identifying features) did have eye-shine as a characteristic (of course I can't find it now ....).

Some ad-hoc references:

http://rainforest-australia.com/spotligh.htm "

"Possum-spotting experts can often tell which species of possum they are looking at simply by their eyeshine colour. The Herbert River ringtail has a pink or yellow eyeshine, the green ringtail has a dull red, brushtails and striped possums have a pinkish eyeshine, and lemuroid possums have the brightest eyeshine of a white or yellow glare. Tree-kangaroos reflect only a dull red shine, but spiders, geckos and many other nocturnal animals have eyes that glisten or sparkle."


http://dpipwe.tas.gov.au/invasive-species/current-programs/fox-eradication-program/information-for-hunters

"Fox eyeshine is very bright with obvious separation of the eyes. Foxes have no characteristic eyeshine colour and it may vary from silver to golden yellow to red. However, eyeshine will always be very bright even when light is not directly on the animal. Fox eyeshine is often described as being like shining a light on a mirror."



http://www.wettropics.gov.au/site/user-assets/docs/48NightInTheForest.pdf

"Possum-spotting experts can often tell which species of possum they are looking at
depending on the eyeshine colour. That of Herbert River ringtails is pink or yellow,
green ringtails is dull red and brushtails and striped possums look pinkish. The
lemuroid possum has the brightest eyeshine — a white or yellow glare. Possums
are not the only animals with eyeshine. Tree-kangaroos reflect only a dull red shine
but the eyes of spiders, geckos and many other nocturnal animals glisten or
sparkle."



There is an app which claims to contain eye-shine for ferals (iPhone only, with android under development) (I don't have an iphone so I cant check it) (No Affiliation) :
http://www.feral.org.au/mobile-phone-apps/
 

Aussie123

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Yet another reference:
http://rrrc.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/Carmody-J-2011-Wet-Tropics-Tour-Guide-Handbook.pdf

This is from the "Wet Tropics of Queensland World Herritage Area Tour Guide Handbook" by Julie Cramody. A nice pdf to download in its own right !

"Rainforest possums have different coloured eyeshine depending on the species. With practice the colours and brightness can be used to help identify the different species; lemuroid ringtails have the brightest eyeshine – a brilliant white/yellow glare – Herbert River ringtails have a pink/ yellow eyeshine, green ringtails a dimmer red eyeshine and brushtails and striped possums have a pinkish eyeshine. Sometimes the colours appear different if the animals are not looking straight at you or if they are juveniles, so use the eyeshine merely as an indicator."
 

auscraft

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Thanks Aussie123
Some of the references you give match my findings and others raise some more research required.
I will do a table up and see how things go
Again thanks but please any info anyone can give will be appreciated
 

auscraft

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As spotlighting is used by Naturalists as well as hunters, if you are an observer please insure you research the best practise methods for the target species you are spotlighting. In some cases filters may increase your chances of not scaring away the animal and also protects some from pain and distress due to their eye sensitivity.
I am not an expert this subject just interests me for several reasons.
Colourscan vary with the angle at which it is viewed and including the colour and type of light source. From what I can tell L.E.D is not as accurate as the incandescent bulbs, it appears they have less range of colours reflected. The preferred angles for colour recording seems, the light to be held at eye level shinning down/up into the targets eyes with target species square on.
Another issue with the colouring, it is subjective what I mean the colours are as faras I am aware are just basic descriptions either by the source I found or my own findings. To my knowledge I am not aware of a specific colour chart that isused to determine the actual colours.

Species
Type
Reflection colour
Notes
C
Dogs
Domestic
green/gold to gold/yellow
Dingo
?do they differ

Wild
?do they differ
Fox
Adult
golden yellow
Kits & Sub adults
dull yellow
Cats Domestic
Kittens
Blue
Green or Yellow eyed
Greenish
Blued eyed
Reddish
Cats Feral
?do they differ
Possums
Ringtails
Pale Red
Herbert River Ringtail
Pink or Yellow
Green Ringtail
Dull Red
Bobuck (mountain)
Pinkish
Common Brushtail
pinkish
Squirrel Glider
Pale ?
Sugar Glider
Pale ?
Yellow Bellied
Pale Red ?
Greater
Pale Red ?
Feathertail
Dull Glisten
Pygmy
Dull Glisten
Stripped
pinkish
Deer
Bright Yellow
Macropods
Kangaroos
Wallabies
Tree Kangaroo
Dull Red
Pigs
Dull red-orange to yellow orange.
Sheep
greenish blue
Goats
greenish blue
Cows
Blue
Horses
Blue
Rodents
? reds
Crocodiles
bright red
Koalas
?
Owls
Possibly by species
Birds
?
Bats
Red
For those that have eye shine
Frogs
Green
Spiders
Glisten,
those active at night are dull coloured Up close appear pink
Water buffalo
Possible Blue
Yabby
Reddish
Bandicoot
Brown
White/pinkish?
Flash from camera poor angle
Management,suggests that using filtered lights of less than 30W increases both the chance of finding animals and the viewing time. Robyn’s study showed that brighter bulbs penetrate deeper into the forest, warning animals of the imminent approach of observers. When being observed, animals were less agitated by filtered lights below 30W and therefore less likely to move away. Lights under 30W are also thought to reduce observer fatigue, an important issue when considering safety of others and efficiency of a spotlighting program”. From http://www.wettropics.gov.au/site/user-assets/docs/48NightInTheForest.pdfthis link has many great suggestions Thanks again Aussie123 for the link.
Victoria nHunting:-The spotlighting of deer is not only illegal, but it is dangerous, unethical and reduces the recreational hunting opportunities for law-abiding hunters. This fact sheet details hunters’ requirements when in possession of a fire arm and spotlight when in recognised deer habitat. Other states have similar laws and regulations with regards to hunting by spotlights with certain animals please check all required laws and Regs within your state yourself I am not a legal expert.
 
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Aussie123

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Your table seems to be displaying as white on white ?
I can see it only if I highlight the text !
 
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Aussie123

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Asspotlighting is used by Naturalists as well as hunters, if you are an observerplease insure you research the best practise methods for the target species youare spotlighting. In some cases filters may increase your chances of notscaring away the animal and also protects some from pain and distress due totheir eye sensitivity.
I amnot an expert this subject just interests me for several reasons.
Colourscan vary with the angle at which it is viewed and including the colour and typeof light source. From what I can tell L.E.D is not as accurate as theincandescent bulbs, it appears they have less range of colours reflected. Thepreferred angles for colour recording seems, the light to be held at eye levelshinning down/up into the targets eyes with target species square on.
Anotherissue with the colouring, it is subjective what I mean the colours are as faras I am aware are just basic descriptions either by the source I found or myown findings. To my knowledge I am not aware of a specific colour chart that isused to determine the actual colours.

Species
Type
Reflection colour
Notes
C
Dogs
Domestic
green/gold to gold/yellow



Dingo
?do they differ



Wild
?do they differ


Fox
Adult
golden yellow



Kits & Sub adults
dull yellow


Cats Domestic
Kittens
Blue



Green or Yellow eyed
Greenish



Blued eyed
Reddish


Cats Feral

?do they differ


Possums
Ringtails
Pale Red



Herbert River Ringtail
Pink or Yellow



Green Ringtail
Dull Red



Bobuck (mountain)
Pinkish



Common Brushtail
pinkish



Squirrel Glider
Pale ?



Sugar Glider
Pale ?



Yellow Bellied
Pale Red ?



Greater
Pale Red ?



Feathertail
Dull Glisten



Pygmy
Dull Glisten



Stripped
pinkish


Deer

Bright Yellow


Macropods
Kangaroos




Wallabies




Tree Kangaroo
Dull Red


Pigs

Dull red-orange to yellow orange.


Sheep

greenish blue


Goats

greenish blue


Cows

Blue


Horses

Blue


Rodents

? reds


Crocodiles

bright red


Koalas

?


Owls

Possibly by species


Birds

?


Bats

Red
For those that have eye shine

Frogs

Green


Spiders

Glisten,
those active at night are dull coloured Up close appear pink

Water buffalo

Possible Blue


Yabby

Reddish


Bandicoot
Brown
black/pinkish?
Flash from camera poor angle

Management,suggests that using filtered lights of less than 30W increases both the chanceof finding animals and the viewing time. Robyn’s study showed that brighterbulbs penetrate deeper into the forest, warning animals of the imminentapproach of observers. When being observed, animals were less agitated byfiltered lights below 30W and therefore less likely to move away. Lights under30W are also thought to reduce observer fatigue, an important issue when consideringsafety of others and efficiency of a spotlighting program”. From http://www.wettropics.gov.au/site/user-assets/docs/48NightInTheForest.pdfthis link has many great suggestions Thanks again Aussie123 for the link.
VictorianHunting:-The spotlighting of deer is not only illegal, but it is dangerous,unethical and reduces the recreational hunting opportunities for law-abidinghunters. This fact sheet details hunters’ requirements when in possession of afirearm and spotlight when in recognised deer habitat. Other states havesimilar laws and regulations with regards to hunting by spotlights with certainanimals please check all required laws and Regs within your state yourself I amnot a legal expert.
Hope you don't mind. I've "replied" and edited the colour to make it a bit more readable - I had to shine a bright light to get the words to shine back at me ! :_lol:
 

auscraft

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Sorry about that my background is the new grey and white text.
What you did is fine and sorry I did not reply sooner I have actually been away from computer
 
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Ticklebellly

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Recent experience prompts this response. I have a seriously good population of Ringtails, Brushtails, and Sugar Gliders. The occasional Koala and dogs next door, plus the occasional (temporary) feral cat add to the mix. I spot up to 10 native animals each night. Ringtails, Brushtails, and Gliders return eyeshine in the red spectrum. Outstanding incident the other night where a brushtail returned a very white return. The difference to normal expectation led me to believe I had spotted something different but I did get close enough to positively the animal as a brushtail. I am pretty sure of the range of the individual animals here and the outstanding animal was not likely a resident.

Further, cats return a green eye reflection and Koalas a really bright white reflection. Note that I never paint any animal for an extended period and use a red LED for more close up observation. I think the colour temperature of the illumination device will have a large effect on the observed colour of any reported eyeshine.

I usually have four camera traps out each night and IR illumination universally returns white eyeshine. Might try taking a bit more notice of exactly what eyeshine comes back over the next few nights.

TB
 

Ticklebellly

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Any chance the stranger was a mountain brushtail?
Did not consider that. Forest here is on the dry side and only 120 metres above sea level. My stranger was much more shy than the residents and I was not able to get really close on the night. If I see the unusual eyeshine again, I will take more care to ensure the exact species.

TB
 

koalaboi

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Hi,

Where did you get the colours for your table?

I was in Royal National Park a year or two back and shining my torch around at night saw scores of bright red lights in the valley around me. Deer...definitely not yellow.

KB
 

Ticklebellly

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Any chance the stranger was a mountain brushtail?
That was quick - spotting tonight returned a noticeable white eyeshine from one Brushtail. I don't shine the white light in their eyes more than necessary but did get quite close to this one and confirm that it was a standard brushtail. Other brushtails and ringtails seen, all returned the expected orange/red eyeshine.

TB
 
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