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Bird Emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae)

auscraft

Henry Arthur Readford
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Scientific Name: Dromaius novaehollandiae

Common Name: Emu

Order: Struthioniformes or Casuariiformes

Family: Casuariidae

Other Names: NA

Distribution: common over most of mainland Australia, although it avoids heavily populated areas, dense forest, and arid areas.[SUP][[/SUP]

Habitat: sclerophyll forest and savanna woodland, and least common in populated and very arid areas, except during wet periods.[SUP][[/SUP]

Field Notes: The Emu is a large flightless bird. They stand to be 1.5 to 2 metres tall, and on average weight 36 kilograms. They have 3 toes, and long legs which allows them to run extremely fast. In this species, the female is larger than the male.
Emu's feed on grass, leaves and small insects. They live all over Australia in grasslands.
The female lays up to 20 eggs, which are large and are soft dark green in colour. These eggs are often prized not only by humans for decoration pieces, but by animals as a food source. The male incubates the eggs for a period of 7-8 weeks, and does not leave the nest for this period. When the eggs hatch, the male emu looks after the hatchlings for another six months.
Amazing Fact: The Emu is the world's third largest bird. The Ostrich and the Cassowary take the top positions.
Animal Facts: The nest of an Emu can be up to 1.5 metres wide!

Source: http://www.australianfauna.com/emu.php & http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emu

Photo by auscraft 2012.

View attachment 3477View attachment 3478
 

Greatbloke

Jack Abasalom
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Great pics, auscraft,...love the close up head shot.

That Wikipedia page is particularly informative. When I as a kid we had scrambled eggs made from an egg that Dad blew out; Rich and very tasty.

I've never seen an emu nest myself, but their are plenty of emus at Wilson's prom in Victoria.
 

koalaboi

Ray Mears
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Away last year and we ate whole emu cooked in a ground oven...took two days but was sensational. It had been a good season when we went in April way out west in nsw and the bird had a lot of fat on it.

Another bird in September after a long dry spell had no fat and the meat was pretty stringy.

A plucked emu with its litlle chicken wings is a funny sight.

KB
 

Aussie123

Never Alone In The Bush
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Scats and tracks:

Typical splat scat, although these are often quite rounded (circular). Formed by "wet" material falling from a height, often these contain fibers and seeds :
P1280177 (Small).jpg

A much drier scat, surely this is the emu Prince of Poo ?
P1280511 (Small).jpg

Tracks:
P1280446 (Small).jpg
 

koalaboi

Ray Mears
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Just back from another trip out west.

Emu on the menu again.

The bird was plucked and then the intestines removed. The stomach emptied and cleaned up a bit. The bird's legs folded in close and then placed on a thick layer of gum leaves in a pit with a good bed of hot coals. More leaves then a sheet of iron roofing, dirt and a small fire on top. The bird's head was placed out in the open and the mouth propped open with a stick. Once the steam started coming out the mouth you knew it was cooking!

A bit over two hours later and the bird lifted out ont a bed of fresh leaves and carved up.

The meat was tender and extremely good. The liver tasted great: really strong pate, the stomach also was pretty damned fine.

The fat taken off and boiled up to get the oil to rub into the skin and on arthritic joints. Also used to oil up wooden artefacts.

KB
 

Aussie123

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Fascinating. I love the concept of leaving the head as a vent.

Were the feathers used for anything ?
 

Hairyman

Ludwig Leichhardt
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Just back from another trip out west.

Emu on the menu again.

The bird was plucked and then the intestines removed. The stomach emptied and cleaned up a bit. The bird's legs folded in close and then placed on a thick layer of gum leaves in a pit with a good bed of hot coals. More leaves then a sheet of iron roofing, dirt and a small fire on top. The bird's head was placed out in the open and the mouth propped open with a stick. Once the steam started coming out the mouth you knew it was cooking!

A bit over two hours later and the bird lifted out ont a bed of fresh leaves and carved up.

The meat was tender and extremely good. The liver tasted great: really strong pate, the stomach also was pretty damned fine.

The fat taken off and boiled up to get the oil to rub into the skin and on arthritic joints. Also used to oil up wooden artefacts.

KB
Did you see any gizzard stones (gastroliths) as the emu was butchered KB? From time to time I find very smooth stones in
areas where the natural gravel is angular and wonder if the smooth stones have been through an emu.
 
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