Eastern Grey Kangaroo Tracks

auscraft

Henry Arthur Readford
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Taken Today . Big grey Male tracks both sets.
first pic a richochete track print approx= 160mm bounding length - 2040mm
the second and third pics are its punting tracks which proves it being a male hand prints=120mm each put gait= 900mm and just track including hands was approx=500mm foot print = 300mm
View attachment 9526View attachment 9527View attachment 9528

Punting is the gait a roo uses eating and pottering around, With most macropods punting you will see the full rear print not just the toes also the front paws are used in this gait aswell some roos also show tail prints (as above ) shown middle of foot prints. In regards as to being male or female this was easy with the grey as the front paws are very different in size (most noticible of all roos) the Male is around the 12cm and females only have at the largest 7cm.
Richocheting is the bipedal gait of all macropods in its normal bounding motion it only shows the rear foot toes as in first pic.

The small print going in opposite direction was a wallaby I had to follow back a few steps to ensure it was not a juvenile track.

I might add here the large Roos and wallabies is one problem with the use of a tracking sticks. The usual size is of tracking sticks are only 3 ft so either you just use a tape or when you are more intuned just eye it off . That being said tracking sticks do still have a very big part in tracking other species or just for quick measurements .
 
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Dusty Miller

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There seems to be juvenile tracks going the other way in the centre of the grey sand set. A tail print too.
 

auscraft

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Dusty M that was actually a swamp wallaby track but good pickup on the second track
 

Dusty Miller

Alexander Pearce
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Always an option for smaller prints. The roo tracks might be a bit more weathered, what order did they occur?
 

auscraft

Henry Arthur Readford
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Thanks again it was the grey first as you said then the wallaby. and yes it is an option I looked at too as i had to back track two steps to positively ID the wallaby .

I might add here the large Roos and wallabies is one problem with the use of a tracking sticks. The usually size is of tracking sticks are only 3 ft so either you just use a tape or when you are more intuned just eye it off . That being said tracking sticks do still have a very big part in tracking other species or just for quick measurements
 

Aussie Forager CQ

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Very cool mate. I'm a relative novice.........I was wondering what exactly is 'punting' (and ricocheting for that matter) and how does that prove it's a male? Interesting stuff!
 

auscraft

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Thanks Aussie Forager
Ok Punting is the gait a roo uses eating and pottering around, With most macropods punting you will see the full rear print not just the toes also the front paws are used in this gait aswell some roos also show tail prints (as above ) shown middle of foot prints. In regards as to being male or female this was easy with the grey as the front paws are very different in size (most noticible of all roos) the Male is around the 12cm and females only have at the largest 7cm.
Richocheting is the bipedal gait of all macropods in its normal bounding motion it only shows the rear foot toes as in first pic.
Hope this helps if not I will try and do a better explaination.
 
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