Dying of Cold Outside

swampy99

Rüdiger Nehberg
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Having felt the effects of mild hypothermia while on a tac ex in Otterburn in Northan England it was not a nice feeling and it was only by recognising the signs and symptoms in my mates that we stopped adn got a brew on and set about getting our selves warm again that it did not lead in to an emergency cas evac.
 

pap11y

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I can't believe the childs limbs had frozen solid.

Good article, thanks for sharing..
 

Bernoulli

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I don't imagine that many have died of hypothermia in Australia, but it could happen. I doesn't have to be nearly as cold as it was in the article. One should always be prepared to protect oneself from Mother Nature.
 

gelandangan

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Having lived all my life where heat strokes are the main problem faced for most, this is a new knowledge for me.
Thank you.
 

biggles1024

Rüdiger Nehberg
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That is a very informative article. Thanks for drawing attention to it.
 

Moondog55

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I don't imagine that many have died of hypothermia in Australia, but it could happen. I doesn't have to be nearly as cold as it was in the article. One should always be prepared to protect oneself from Mother Nature.
Actually it is far more common and has killed more people here than you would think.
So many in fact that there was a special publication called "Death by Exposure is not an Accident"
Exposure being the old term for what we now call hypothermia. Don't forget all the old people who can't afford to heat their homes in a Southern winter and all the homeless living rough too.
 

nifty

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Interesting reading, thanks.
I was told an easy way to look for the signs of hypothermia was to watch out for the ' UMBLES '
STUMBLES, MUMBLES, FUMBLES and GRUMBLES.
 

Browny

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In sunny Perth, it still gets cold enough in winter for this to happen. Ive noticed the early signs a few times over the years, just gotta stop what you are doing and get warm.

Dont forgetalso, that getting wet makes it much more likely/quicker to happen. From memory, it only takes about 15 mins in the Swan River in winter to start.
Much easier to recover, but if you were stuck out somewhere and couldnt get warm/dry, youre in a spot o bother.
 

Bartnmax

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It's surprising how far more common this is than many people think.
Also interesting to note that often it's in some of our areas usually associated with extreme heat that the extreme cold can catch you out.
Desert environments, so commonly thought of as being so hot, can be increadibly cold during the night.
I have spent a night near Alice Springs where the day time temp reached well in excess of 40 deg C, yet it got down to minus 8 deg C at night.
Never thought I'd be sleeping in my clothes in sleeping bag with extra blanket in such a hot place & still be so bloody cold.
It was a great lesson learned all those years ago - research properly the area into which yer travelling.
 

Aussie123

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I don't imagine that many have died of hypothermia in Australia, but it could happen. I doesn't have to be nearly as cold as it was in the article. One should always be prepared to protect oneself from Mother Nature.
Hypothermia is very common especially in temps between -5 and +5 with rain (wet) involved. That's spot on for much of Australia.


The article is about hypothermia, but you can also take the point that it is about being prepared for your trip and being aware of the changing circumstances which may present themselves.
I’m very guilty of making plans and sticking to them, just like the person in the article, who pushes on through warning, and adversity and did not revise his plans. Fixed goal, fixed mindset.

I think there is a message here for us all and it is relevant for any environment and any time of year be it snow, bushfires, floods etc etc
 

pap11y

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I think I came pretty close to hypothermia once (on a yacht in the beginning of spring in Sydney harbour). It was cold and was raining and I didn't have a waterproof jacket.

After a warm shower I shivered in bed for at least 1-2 hours before I was good..

Bad prep on my part..
 

Jeepcreep

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Since I live in a definite 4 season climate,hypothermia is very possible.One fact that is worthy of noting,if the ground temp is 50° and a human lays down on the bare ground,he/ she will die of hypothermia within 1 hour,even full clothed.My point,we may not realize how close we come to hypothermia,if you are shivering uncontrollablly,your body senses hypothermia and is trying to fight it by warming itself through the shiver reaction.
 

Howling Dingo

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Since I live in a definite 4 season climate,hypothermia is very possible.One fact that is worthy of noting,if the ground temp is 50° and a human lays down on the bare ground,he/ she will die of hypothermia within 1 hour,even full clothed.My point,we may not realize how close we come to hypothermia,if you are shivering uncontrollablly,your body senses hypothermia and is trying to fight it by warming itself through the shiver reaction.

You to be pretty bad shape to die in one hour..?When I did outdoor stuff in the UK hypothermia was on the radar.Shivering is just the start of hypothermia.At the later stages just before you did did you feel warm and good and tend to go walkabout.Well that is what I was told at the time.
 

Jeepcreep

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That's my point,at 50°f ground temp, most folks give little thought that it could kill them.Suppose Joe was hiking alone,slipped and fell,knocking himself unconsience,lying on the cold ground.A humans body temp average is somewhere near 98.6°f,dropping just 3°f,to 95°f,hypothermia sets in,Joe is still unconsience,preventing him from actively warming himself,in as little as 1 hour of lying on the bare ground,Joe,never stood a chance,he never regained consienceness,Joe died of exposure.
Yes if you have the ability ,your body attempts to fight it off,but just like cold water or the cold ground,if you cannot get out or up,your life is soon over.I was once told by an avid outdoorsman,he said "You will never go to sleep and freeze to death,you will always wake up,and then freeze to death" His point,be very careful of your circumstance,once you reach a certain stage unless you get outside help quickly,your not gonna make it,no matter what.
 

Thrud

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Eventually in hypothermia the shivering will stop, this is a bad sign. What then happens is the blood vessels in the skin, which have been constricted, trying to maintain core temp, will dilate. This makes the sufferer feel as though they are overheating and they will try and undress. This is what happened to Lincoln Hall on Everest.
 

Qually

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I have been on a multi day mountains hike with a guy that got hypo after all his stuff got wet. it wasn't even that cold, maybe down to about 8 or 10. His down sleeping bag had collapsed and he just went to bed wet and cold. By morning he was in a bad way, almost unable to speak. He didn't wake anyone or tell us that he was too cold. He was approaching the last stages of hypothermia. It was pretty rough just seeing what shape he was in. We got a big fire going and made a reflector from a space blanket, made a big pot of hot water and changed all his clothes for our dry ones. We still had to use our distress beacon to get him out of there.

Don't be fooled by conditions that aren't that cold, thats the temps that kill most from hypothermia and If you are ever out with others and you get too cold you must tell the others you are with, it could save your life.
 

Jeepcreep

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Great post Qually,I'm afraid it's a subject we don't think of enough.
 
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