Dingo and red fox skulls

Hairyman

Ludwig Leichhardt
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Below are two dingo skulls and a red fox skull for comparison.

Picture 003.jpgPicture 002.jpgPicture 005.jpgPicture 004.jpgPicture 006.jpgPicture 007.jpgPicture 008.jpgPicture 009.jpg

A dingoes breakfast is said to be drink of water and a look around.
For lunch they could probably have a fox if they wanted to.
 

Blake

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Awesome stuff. Feel free to add these to the dingo entry as well.
 

Hairyman

Ludwig Leichhardt
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Death by snare
Found this fox mummy/skeleton this morning. Its not often the cause of death can be guessed this long after death (except bullet holes through bones).
This was in an isolated area at least a few kms form the nearest house (except mine).
I do not use or condone the use of snares. I imagine death was drawn out and painfull and that the animal wandered around for some time after the wire broke from its attachment.
The snare itself was a light gauge gal wire with a slip knot. It was probably set for a dingo but could catch many things.

IMG_1062.jpg
 
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Dusty Miller

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No, snares are a pretty grim death. The animals must become quite frightened as it tightens and then panic. Ranks down with poison as something to avoid using unless absolutely necessary. As with poison snares are indiscdriminate, and like land mines, can kill a long time after setting. From the image it looks like he was able to get his front legs through, then caught around in front of the back legs. Probably died of thirst or got infected from cutting by wire.
If you are lost and starving, by all means, but always remove snares and traps. Always check non-lethal traps every morning at least, and never leave them set. Some animals caught in non-lethal traps can die from heatstroke if left for even a few hours in direct sunlight. If you need to kill an animal do it humanely with a firearm of adequate power.
 

Vixen

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To be honest those top larger skulls look more like some sort of domestic dog, or at least a dog / dingo hybrid - my German Shepherd skull looks exactly the same.

The big giveaway between domestic and 'wild' type canines is that dogs have more of a pronounced 'angle' going up the front of the skull, while a Dingo or even say Wolf, it will be alot smoother - almost straight.

Nice finds though, I would be ecstatic to find something like that!
 

Hairyman

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Hi Vixen,
I wouldnt be suprised if these dog/dingo skulls are hybrid as the local dingo/feral dog population looks quite mixed, some clasic dingo
colouring and shape others various shades and shapes.
Do you have expertise in this area or any links to sites with this type of comparison?
What suprised me was the similarity the dog and fox skulls had despite the size difference.

Hairy
 
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