Daldinia aka King Alfred's cake, cramp balls, and coal fungus

Aussie123

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Out on a walk last weekend I picked up a cluster of lovely daldinia fungi growing on a log by the river.
20180312_130605 (Medium).jpg 20180312_144258 (Medium).jpg

They seem to like damp areas, and especially dead acacias.
It has been warm and dry for ages and these were firm and "snapped" off the log with a very satisfying little "crack" sound.
They are bone dry and should directly take a spark from a flint and steel (without any additional treatment) ... however its been a bit too hot and fire restrictions to play with just now

20180312_144410 (Medium).jpg

Of course I left some, so they can regrow next season.
 

Le Loup

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Out on a walk last weekend I picked up a cluster of lovely daldinia fungi growing on a log by the river.
View attachment 24906 View attachment 24907

They seem to like damp areas, and especially dead acacias.
It has been warm and dry for ages and these were firm and "snapped" off the log with a very satisfying little "crack" sound.
They are bone dry and should directly take a spark from a flint and steel (without any additional treatment) ... however its been a bit too hot and fire restrictions to play with just now

View attachment 24908

Of course I left some, so they can regrow next season.
Thanks for this Aussie, very interesting, let us know how they perform. I have not seen any of these in my area of New England.
Keith.
 

Blake

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Out on a walk last weekend I picked up a cluster of lovely daldinia fungi growing on a log by the river.
View attachment 24906 View attachment 24907

They seem to like damp areas, and especially dead acacias.
It has been warm and dry for ages and these were firm and "snapped" off the log with a very satisfying little "crack" sound.
They are bone dry and should directly take a spark from a flint and steel (without any additional treatment) ... however its been a bit too hot and fire restrictions to play with just now

View attachment 24908

Of course I left some, so they can regrow next season.
Great post Aussie. Very interesting and definitely one I haven't seen before. You could almost excuse these as Roo droppings if they were on the ground. Interesting also seeing them growing on that burnt fallen log. Have you seen them growing on living timber before?
 

ChrisM

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Where about were they found? Which state?


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Aussie123

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Great post Aussie. Very interesting and definitely one I haven't seen before. You could almost excuse these as Roo droppings if they were on the ground. Interesting also seeing them growing on that burnt fallen log. Have you seen them growing on living timber before?
I've never seen them on live wood, only things which are well and truly dead. This was (obviously) on a horizontal timber, but I have seen them on upright (dead) trees too.
They are definitely have a roo poo look to them, but they are always attached to wood

Here's a standing tree "studded" with daldinia
20170709_113851 (Medium).jpg

Where about were they found? Which state?
Victoria, Toolangi (damp sub-tropical rainforest / mountain ash)

.. although I once found one near the Glenelg River (near Mt Gambia in SA); but at the time I didn't realise what it was
 
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