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crossfire pack

payney

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Who has seen the movie "the hunter" with willem dafoe? this is the pack he uses in the film and i like the look of it so i found it now
im thinking about saving my pocket money (work overtime) to buy one for multi day trips. Check it out let me know what you think
id like advice from some more seasoned bushcrafters. Its called the crossfire dg-1 see more at-

http://crossfire.com.au/category/packs
 

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chutes

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Ouch. That website gives me sticker shock. $375 for a pack FRAME?

The DG-1 pack itself is far more reasonably priced (although it is only a two/three day pack) and it seems to have some nice features for a military pack.
 

Wentworth

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I've heard that Crossfire does very solid stuff. That pack has a feature that all my packs have; big front pocket for tarp and raingear and side pockets for water bottles. Looks great to me.
 

payney

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I also have my eye on the moroka 30 http://www.moroka30.com.au/alpine-stalker-75lt-rucksack-p-19.html
this would cover me for more time in the bush and would be more versatile eg backpack hunting and hiking but is quite expensive. Although I'm
sure the versatility offsets the cost. My thoughts were on something for 2/3 days my current Badlands day pack will handle an overnight trip
with ease so the DG-1 would bridge the gap and later on when i have more bushcrafting, hiking and hunting experience I could look into the
moroka 30 pack or similar.
 

Walker

John McDouall Stuart
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im thinking about saving my pocket money (work overtime) to buy one for multi day trips. Check it out let me know what you think
id like advice from some more seasoned bushcrafters. Its called the crossfire dg-1 see more at-

http://crossfire.com.au/category/packs

Packs are as personal as undies. So, I'm just giving my 2 cents worth.

I assume by your post you'll be using it for multi day trips (on or off track doesn't matter)?

Personally, I'd steer clear of packs with side pockets. Having experienced mates who have packs with side pockets they tend to wear and cause fatigue = reduced pack life and enjoyment of a trip. Regardless of whether you walk on or off tracks, side pockets tend to catch on scrub and don't protect what's in them.

A good rule of thumb is, the more openings and stitching = reduced waterproofness and marginal weight increase. I'd concentrate on: the harness, a single sack (no zips between top and botton or side pockets), the material.

I've mentioned this elsewhere on the website a number of times - personally recommend Wilderness Equipment (Aussie WA made) and MacPac (NZ made). Both use a composite of canvas and cordura on wear areas.

The single most important feature of a good rucksack is the harness (inclusive of a fully adjustable hip belt) - it needs to be robust, adjustable, and dynamic - for varying loads, terrain, and conditions e.g. well balanced for those exposed climbs, and dynamic for variable terrain. After all, your back can bend and swivel, why not the combo of harness and pack?

If you want pockets, make sure they are on the top and back of the rucksack - not the sides.

Use the 'KISS' principle = 'Keep It Simple Stupid or (Straightforward)'.

The more stitching = leaks, more straps and pockets = weight and problems with catching on scrub. Concentrate equally on the intended use, harness, the sack, the materials. Canvas is heavy but waterproof and durable, synthetics are light but can be less waterproof and durable.

A bit of homework will save you many $$.

Regardless, just enjoy the bush!
 
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Corin

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I walk with a macpack, and buy Wilderness equipment for the scouts. So Walker summed it up for me. one thing though, too high is just as bad as too wide, when you duck your head to go underthings your pack does not duck and you get caught on everything. Worst thing about Macpacks Ascent.
 

Walker

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I walk with a macpack, and buy Wilderness equipment for the scouts. So Walker summed it up for me. one thing though, too high is just as bad as too wide, when you duck your head to go underthings your pack does not duck and you get caught on everything. Worst thing about Macpacks Ascent.

Thumbs up, yeah agree.

Back length is very important. A good pack brand will include two or three different back lengths in a model, which itself is adjustable within several centimetres for weight loading, etc. I used a MacPac (Canyon) for years and found no problems - very versatile and comfortable (if not a little small for long trips), but was moved towards buying a Wilderness Equipment (Karijini) when the MacPack harness wore out and it was gonna cost the equivalent of a new pack to replace the harness. So I simply purchased a new WE rucksack and it rocks!

Correct pack length = should sit comfortably loaded on the hips and not extend beyond the shoulders or there abouts regardless of your height.
 

Howling Dingo

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Lol..Just saw the DVD of that film the other day and remember thinking what a cool looking pack.
 

Wentworth

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Edited. No longer recommend this brand
 
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payney

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Well going off what you say Walker I was thinking I might be better off spending a few more bob on the moroka 30
pack but it's just a bit big for short trips I feel so I'm now up for suggestions on a pack for use up to three days lay it on me guys.

Also I do prefer the military/hunting style packs.
 
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chutes

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My most recent pack acquisition is a hybrid pack from a mob called platatac.

SPUR Tropical MSM 3 Day Pack
spur-msm-troipical-aus_cam_1.jpg

http://www.platatac.com/spur-msm-tropical-pack-auscam-special/w1/i1046397/

Mine's khaki rather than camouflaged, but the camo ones are currently on special for $149. I paid around $200 for mine.

Why did I choose such a pack?

*I do a lot of travel, so it's a travel pack as well as a bush pack
*Unlike many of these style of pack, it's got half decent shoulder strap adjustment
This one has a "tropical" frame which can either be adjusted to give airflow between the pack and your back when out in the bush, or it can sit flat against the pack for use when travelling.
*2 x internal water bladder sleeves
*MOLLE straps on the outside and on the insert so you can up the carrying capacity if required.
*It's bombproof - really well made and rugged as hell.

There are a couple of cons -

1. It's quite a heavy pack. You could do worse than ditch the insert, the extra straps and cut off any of the MOLLE strapping you don't use.
2. There's not much of a hip belt and what there is isn't all that well padded - despite this, it can be adjusted correctly to suit for walking.
3. The main opening is a single, double-ended zipper. Trust me when I say this is an extremely rugged zipper, but if it fails, you're screwed. There are six side-release buckles as backup, and to cinch down the pack, but they can't replace the main closure. One pack mod I have been considering is sewing the pack halfway shut.
4. As walker said in his great pack post, the more stitching there is, the more opportunities for water ingress. Well this pack is showerproof and that's it. There are screened vents, loads of stitching, hydration tubing ports and zippers all over it. If there's a sustained downpour or you decide to lilo it across a creek or river, the inside will get wet. Pack accordingly.

For $150, I'd recommend it as a good 2-3 day pack so long as you pack light.

Here's a pic of mine loaded up from a recent bushwalk - note that I was unsure about the safety of the water, and wasn't sure if I'd be gone more than 1 night, so I carried 2 x 3 litre water bladders and 3 x 1 litre water bottles. I still had plenty of room for blanket, hammock, tucker, book, cooking gear, etc. Turns out I didn't need the extra water.
DSCN1198.jpg
 
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Templar

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Red23

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I have recently gotten my hands on one of these, and I think its the perfect pack for overnight or longer

http://www.mysteryranch.com/hunting/daypacks/big-horn-pack

I haven't actually been out in it though, I loaded it up and it was very comfortable, I'm very pleased so far.

I have an overnighter that includes a few km's hiking coming up in a month, so I'll get a really good idea of whats what then.
 

payney

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Well the more help you provide the more complicated it gets. I don't mind the SPUR pack in the khaki rather than camo, I
notice you have pouches on the side attached via the molle system and going back to what walker said do you find they catch
on things while in the scrub? The sniper one pack is very similar to the crossfire I had been looking at first witch I still really like
oh decisions decisions.
 

chutes

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No problems with the SPUR Tropical MSM catching on vegetation, but I haven't really done any off track stuff while wearing it. In this situation, any extra pouches would go on the back panel rather than the sides. The pack isn't tall enough to be a problem in close country.

Aside from the Sniper One pack, also check out the non-"modular"/MOLLE SPUR packs. I reckon they are a good design, with the tropical frame and without. AJs seem to love em.

spur-tropical-aus-web-1.jpg


As mentioned previously, a Medium ALICE will probably meet your needs too - dirt cheap if you get one without a frame. Here's a thread I put together while I was modding mine with a platatac tropical frame...
Air-gap.jpg

http://bushcraftoz.com/forums/showthread.php?1816-Pack-surgery

A slick-sided civilian 3 day pack from Macpack or wherever might be the best bet, but if you're after a military pack, I'd recommend one of the platatac types or a Medium ALICE.
 

Walker

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Well going off what you say Walker I was thinking I might be better off spending a few more bob on the moroka 30
pack but it's just a bit big for short trips I feel so I'm now up for suggestions on a pack for use up to three days lay it on me guys.

Also I do prefer the military/hunting style packs.

Well the more help you provide the more complicated it gets..

Oh yeah. There's so many manufacturers out there and each with several models to choose from.

Going by your initial posts, you want a sack that'll do three days? Maybe summer and winter? Bushwalking or hunting?

I can only comment on bushwalking (and related activities) packs because that's where my experience and interests lay.

1. A good pack regardless of all other things should have a good harness = comfort and reduced fatigue and likelihood of damage to your back, neck and joints. Totally adjustable and fit you perfectly when it's FULLY loaded. As noted earlier, when trying a pack on for fit, load it up with heavy stuff, adjust the hip belt, then the shoulder straps, then the neck straps. A properly fitting pack should sit on the hips (not on the bum), and the top of the fully loaded pack including the top pocket (if it has one) should not extend past ear level. Some say shoulder level but that is often not reality. Basically, you should be able to tilt your head back and be able to look comfortable up without knocking the top of the pack with the back of your scone. (This is particularly important if you climb/mountaineer = visibility and helmut)

2. Then comes the size - the measurements manufacturers use to describe a packs size are inacurate to say the least. A rule of thumb, get one size bigger than you think you'll need because it's easier to use the compression straps to make it smaller than adding pockets or having stuff swinging in the breeze outside the pack (big no-no).

Two day, three day, etc, etc - you'll find that a 'standard' weekend rucksack size will do you for multiple day trips - the basic gear you take doesn't get any bigger. Only the food component grows, and since most foodstuffs after the third day are not fresh (weight and spoilage issues) the weight won't change much either (stove fuel and water not included). What becomes the major issue after three days of hard slog is fatigue and recovery - so the pack actually feels heavier than it is. A standard weekend pack weight for me is about 37-38lb = 17kg. This weight doesn't grow much up to about a 5 dayer, after that it only grows in fractions = dried food, more high energy foodstuffs that are low in weight, etc) Hence the need for a bigger pack as these foods are light but are also bulky.

The caveat on size is the season. Doing a three dayer in the Snowys in snow season will obviously require a larger pack for all the extra gear you'll need.

3. Materials - personal choice. Most synthetics are not overly waterproof, but they are light. Most 'natural' materials like canvas are heavy, but more waterproof. With regards to wear and tear, good manufacturers strengthen and overlay an abrasion resistant material in known wear points. Stitching should be robust and covered to prevent fraying. My personal choice is now canvas with synthetic overlays on wear points. It's heavier, but very strong and easily repaired in the field. Steer clear of packs that have a strap for every ocasion stitched to the outside. Rule of thumb - if you're carrying gear that can't be carried inside the pack or in one of its standard pockets, rethink the size of the pack.

4. In the field - hope for the best, but expect the worst. Meaning, if there is something on the pack that can fail, it probably will when you least expect it to happen and at the most inconvenient time - hopefully not at a critical life threatening moment. A good pack should have some degree of redundancy and be easily jury-rigged and field maintained. This gets back to the quality of the harness. If the bag or pockets crap themselves, easy, just stitch it up. If the harness fails this is where a cheapie will bugger you. Good harnesses tend to attach seperately to a pack and 'float' by way of straps to the sack. A cheapie has a harness stitched directly to the sack. These are bastards to fix in the field, if at all possible. Another advantage of most 'floating' harnesses is the ventilation gap between your back and the pack, again, comfort and fatigue.

5. Colour - why don't they make paisley?!

For a bit more cash, you should be able to get a good rucksack that'll meet all the abovementioned criteria. Forget the hype that Bear Gryll's uses this, the Tongan Army uses that, it's made from vestal virgins in a monestry using silk from genetically modified worms, etc - it's all crap. Buy the best you can afford, wear it out doing the things you like, then learning from the experience, buy a better one in several years.

Most of all, enjoy the outdoors. Good luck with it.
 

payney

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I've been studying the crossfire and the side pockets almost look removable but not sure. Although the more
I look at your spur pack the more I like it it's very flexible as in moving pouches around I like the molle system
there are just so many options these are the 2 at the top of the list I think.
 

payney

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Well Walker that is a lot of helpful info I'm thinking long and hard about it but still keen on the two I mentioned
I think the crossfire is slightly to big so through your wisdom probably is just right I will be mainly hiking as I already
have a hunting pack.

To give you an idea of what i'll be carrying here's a brief list.

bivy bag
sleeping bag
small inflatable pillow
sleeping mat
fly
trangia

It's not a complete list obviously but more of an idea of my style I left out the things like water food additional clothes
to save time as we all know that they will be in there.

PS don't worry i'm not going to copy bear grylls he's a menace.
 

Benny

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I like molle for the customisability (big word for the day) but once you find a layout that you like you rarely change it around, it takes time & wears thin after you've changed it around a few times. But for the extra weight (nothing) it's worth the options.

I don't see the big deal in having the pack itself water proof. With enough rain or river crossings water will enter the pack, to deal with it use dry bags for kit you don't want wet.

Heavy duty zips are pretty damn tough, yes they can fail but this would usually only happen if either they are well & truly worn out (takes a while to wear out a good zip) or the compartment being closed was over loaded & the zip was under pressure. Zips are not meant to be used to compress & be stressed like buckles when securing compartments so I would avoid packs that rely on zips to secure the main compartment.
 
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