Cordage Breaking Strengths

Corin

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Well there you go, I was a bit dubious that7 strands would be enough but I did expect it to be a but stringer than that! Well done on the test and thanks for doing it.
 

Blake

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Very very interesting mate. Thanks so much for the effort gone into these tests its a great set of tests and definitley something I haven't found documented before so well done!
 

Aussie Forager CQ

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Thanks Blake, it's my pleasure. Thanks to my boss for the use :) I'm glad to be involved in recording these results, the more we can break and record the better I reckon!
 

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Rüdiger Nehberg
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Hi All,

A couple more tests I did the other day.....

Test #14

Maker - AFCQ
Material - Hibiscus tiliaceus inner bark.
Construction - 2 ply reverse twisted Z lay.
Average Minimum Diameter -Approx. 1.5mm-2mm
Test Configuration - Eye splice on each end.




RESULT

Breaking strength - 0.15kN (approx. 15kg)



Notes.

Seemed to be a reasonably good test of strength of the material (it didn't break where I spliced in fibres). It broke the smaller of the two strands (slight variance in construction) at the point it enters the splice. When the strand broke the end came out of the splice.



Test #15

Maker - AFCQ
Material - Balloon Cotton Bush*(Asclepias fruticosa) inner bark.
Construction - 2 ply reverse twisted Z lay.
Average Minimum Diameter -Approx. 3.5mm-4mm
Test Configuration - Eye splice on each end.



RESULT

Breaking strength - 0.42 (approx. 40kg)





Notes.

The piece broke the same as test #14. *This was the first time I had made cordage from balloon cotton bush. I had noticed the fibres in the past on living plants but didn't find them too strong or consistent. This time I harvested from standing dead plants and I found the fibres removed better and were stronger from the top of the plant and not from the base. I thought this was strange as I have found it to be opposite in other plants. It worked quite well. This plant is supper common and invasive around here so I am glad to find a use for it. I have since found some references to it's use for fibres.....and the cottony seed head makes good tinder as well.

http://www.thehomeherbalist.com/balloon-cotton-bush/
 

biggles1024

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I don't have any cordage to test, but I just love this thread. :)
 

auscraft

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Af you are doing a brillant job for us doing these tests.
I have one question regarding the tests and that is there a difference between these natural fibres being wet and dry.
My thoughts relate to say using it as fishing line break strength the main one that interests me is the Hibiscus
 

Aussie Forager CQ

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Af you are doing a brillant job for us doing these tests.
I have one question regarding the tests and that is there a difference between these natural fibres being wet and dry.
My thoughts relate to say using it as fishing line break strength the main one that interests me is the Hibiscus
Thanks mate its my pleasure. Good question, I know that certain synthetic fibres do have a strength difference when wet.....and it depends how wet it is, as in how saturated it is and the more saturated the weaker. I believe the weakening is to do with the fibres being able to bind tighter because they are lubricated and therefore having a tighter bend and therefore stressing the individual fibres more and breaking at a lower strength.

I would assume the same thing would happen to natural fibres but it would be good to test, I'll put that on the list for sure. I remember reading that H.tiliaceus was one that was favored for nets and fishing line.....I think it partly resists rot and decay better than others. Maybe it doesn't loose much strength when wet either.....have to put it on the rack :)
 

myneckisred

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Hey Aussie just out of curiosity have done a test on Hootchie cord.only asking as IM making a hammock and was thinking about using braided Hootchie cord for my ropes
 
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Aussie Forager CQ

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Hey Aussie just out of curiosity have done a test on Hootchie cord.only asking as IM making a hammock and was thinking about using braided Hootchie cord for my ropes
Hi mate, I haven't done any hootchie cord yet. I don't have any....I did some paracord (test #1) that worked well. If you wanted to make a set up of how you will rig it you can get it to me and we can test it. You can either send it to the address below or organize a meet sometime.....


PO Box 9807
FRENCHVILLE QLD 4701
 

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Test #16

Maker - AFCQ
Material - Cabbage Palm (Livistona spp)
Construction - Strip of outer frond stem
Average Minimum Width of strip Approx. 10mm-15mm
Test Configuration - Four wraps with one end secured under wraps, other end frapped and finished with a clove hitch. Simulating a lashing.

Here are a couple of pics of how I got the outer strip. Basically just cut a big strip along the length off the stem and then thinned it down to the relatively flexible most outer part....

*









RESULT

Breaking strength - 2.65kN (approx. 265kg)





Notes.
The lashing continuously slipped at 200kg as i only had a half hitch in place. After putting the clove hitch in it held firm until breaking. There's alot of variables with testing strips like this, as the slightest twist can result in sever weakening of the entire strip. All in all it seemed to break evenly.
*



Test #17

Maker - AFCQ
Material - Hibiscus tiliaceus*inner and outer bark.
Construction - Strip of bark, left to dry and used as is.
Average Minimum Width Approx.*
Test Configuration -**Four wraps with one end secured under wraps, other end frapped and finished with a clove hitch. Simulating a lashing.



The strip still has outer bark in place and was nicely dried to see the difference between outer and inner bark.





RESULT



Breaking strength - 2.58kN approx. 258kg



Notes.

There's alot of variables with testing strips like this, as the slightest twist can result in sever weakening of the entire strip. All in all it seemed to break evenly.
*
 

Corin

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Wow that cabbage palm looks like a great material to play with. I will be trying that on! Great information and brilliant work doing the tests well done!
 

New man

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I just wanted to thank you for what was an interesting nd strangely enjoyable thread!
Keep up the good work!
 

Aussie Forager CQ

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Wow that cabbage palm looks like a great material to play with. I will be trying that on! Great information and brilliant work doing the tests well done!
No worries, yeh I'm enjoying playing with cabbage palm, still in a very experimental stage. I reckon there is quite a bit of potential with the outer material above. It's really strong and rather flexible when it's not fully dry, bit of work and a knack to extract it but still doable. However it will still break if it's bent all they way over. Once dry I think it will be a bit brittle though... I reckon it would be great for make shift lashings and while it's green a very small strip of it is twistable into cordage. I reckon the strips might be usable somewhat like bamboo strips.
 

auscraft

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Well done AF. I like this test and is something I prefer than making cordage as seen by the extra strength by using it. Lashings would be great for shelters, axes and so on. One thing to remember is when tieing of green lashings not to over tighten should be firm only , tighteniing will occur as the fibres dry and shrink it will take a little practice to get the wet to dry tensioning correct but will give you very strong fixings.
 

Bloffy13

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Wonder how long they last in the wild. If you'll pardon the pun I suppoe it is a piece of string question really. Depending on exposure, width, weather conditions, humidity, job being used on etc.
Very interesting. Just as a comparison, what thicknesses of natural twine (Jute) and or nylon etc would be comparable in a similar knotted test? Just to give some sort of apple with African Artichokes comparison.
Cheers
Bloffy
 
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