Coimadai Creek Day Walk

Aussie123

Never Alone In The Bush
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Coimadai Creek is a little gem, very close to Melbourne and great for a day walk.
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The tracks are not well defined and its easy to …. end up visiting areas which you don’t intend to (NO we weren’t Lost, I knew exactly where we were, it just wasn’t where anyone thought we were going …. but I knew … I knew ...)
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The creek was running and full of bulrush which we snacked on (sorry – poor focus).
Once split you can see the inner starchy and crispy layers. Delicious !
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Lovely creek flats and shady trees. Lots of mozzies. Very enjoyable
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An interesting scat, full of
African boxthorn. I saw quite a lot of the boxthorns, but none with fruit​
?
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Taplow

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That bulrush looks like a leek! Does it taste anything like one?
 

Aussie123

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That bulrush looks like a leek! Does it taste anything like one?
It does looks a bit like that, but the taste is nothing like it. No "onion" flavours at all.

It has a pleasant, somewhat sweet taste. The texture is crunchy, but soft. The flavour is subtle.
There is nothing quite like it to give as a comparison, but something like bamboo shoot (not the canned ones, and ) ?
Heart of palm ?

I have read descriptions where people compare the flavour to asparagus, but I don't think that's right;
someone described it as "like peanut butter" which I can sort of see, but its not a very good comparison.

The pollen and roots are also edible (the roots really need to be cooked).
 

Thrud

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Thanks for the post. Great pics, the bark on that fallen tree looks amazing.
 

Aussie123

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Thanks for the share, did you eat the bulrush out of water or was it dry ground ?
The stems were eaten fresh from the river - best way to have them IMO.

The roots are better roasted (then eaten like a "stringy" potato); or pounded to extract the starch.
The starch can be dried to form a flour, or added to something as a thickener .... particularly good added to pancakes or damper !
 

Luke777

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The stems were eaten fresh from the river - best way to have them IMO.

The roots are better roasted (then eaten like a "stringy" potato); or pounded to extract the starch.
The starch can be dried to form a flour, or added to something as a thickener .... particularly good added to pancakes or damper !

Ok, I've been wondering if there is a concern over dirty water in the bulrush if eaten straight out the water? Take it you didn't get sick? I see koa windsong mixes the crushed up roots with the fluff from the top of the bulrush stem to make damper cooked in flat rocks over coals.
 

Aussie123

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Ok, I've been wondering if there is a concern over dirty water in the bulrush if eaten straight out the water? Take it you didn't get sick? I see koa windsong mixes the crushed up roots with the fluff from the top of the bulrush stem to make damper cooked in flat rocks over coals.
Yes there IS concern about water quality. I was happy with the quality in this stream (and at this time). A quick rinse with clean water never hurts.
I've seen plenty of bulrush in places where I wouldn't be comfortable eating them.

Crushing the roots releases starch and you will end up with flour (or a flour-water "mix"). Adding the pollen to that flour produces beautiful, golden damper which is really nice.

I'm not sure that the "fluff" (seed head) is particularly good to eat, although I have added some as a flour extender for damper (in the past). It made a "wholemeal" type damper.
 
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