Mammal C. l. dingo (Dingo)

Howling Dingo

Richard Proenneke
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Scientific Name: Canis lupus dingo

Common Name: Dingo

Sub-class: C. l. dingo

Family: Canidae

Other Names: Warrigal

Distribution: All state of Australia expert Tazmaina

Habitat: Highly adaptable dingo is found in all habitats

Field Notes: Dingo are Australian wild dogs,naturally lean and usually cream to a reddish yellow with white points.They are intelligent and inquisitive in nature,sometimes traveling in small packs or to be found alone.Dingos to give off yelps and howls but it does not bark in the same way as modern dog.There diet consists mainly small mammals,carrion,lizards but sometime bigger pray like kangaroos.A dingo will also attack farm stock leading them to be culled by farmers.

A relative newcomer Australia but is thought to have arrived between 3500 and 4000 years ago.The origins of the dingo are uncertain but the main theory is the dog was introduced by Asian seafarers.Perhaps as a result of a shipwreck or trade with the northern aboriginal tribes.

Dingo are no real threat to humans but some attacks on humans have been recorded.Attacks are often involving of young children left unsupervised.






Photo Ozhaggishead


Photo Ozhaggishead



Dingos that have been culled. Photo hotssv's
 
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Aussie123

Never Alone In The Bush
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Dingos can also be black in colour, almost all dingos are bi-coloured, ie will have one predominant colour with areas of a second colour (often white) on the chest, muzzle or legs.

Wild dingos are very inquisitive and will snoop around camps at night. It is quite common for them to pinch items, especially leather shoes left outside at night; they have been known to attack pet dogs left tied up outside at night.
Unfortunately in some places they have learnt that humans mean an easy meal, either scavenging scraps or stealing un-secured food, or being fed !

In areas where people and dingos are known to frequent it does pay to be vigilant. Don’t leave kids alone; and go in pairs if you need a night wee, and keep your camp tidy.
 

auscraft

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Frasier Island is said to be one of the last places to find unaltered genetic populations of dingos. Cross breeding is the problem on the mainlnd packs. Pure dingo are mostly ginger to tan although darker reds to black do exist. They all have paler lower paws usually white and a white tip tail. and the muzzles can be white or black.
the one thing to tell the dingo is dingos in it pure state do not have any dew claws. Some say the dingo on the mainland has been effected by cross breeding by as much as 80 -100%. Teeth and skull are also larger than a domestic dog.
 

Dusty Miller

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Dingoes can bark, they just don't do it a lot, 5% of their vocalisations are barks, and they don't have a big range of barks. Interesting in the article below it states that genetic testing hasn't been able to isolate any sequences not found in other domestic dogs, and the dingo appears to be just a very narrow selection of dog dna. This is an issue for those who want to conserve it, nbecause there is no gene test that can identify a dog as a dingo. I see they are protected in Victoria, which iis odd, because the same government now makes the mass dumping of pit bull dna into the local dingo population almost guaranteed.
They are not protected in Queensland, and I doubt they really need it, since a concerted effort to eradicate them has failed after more than a century. Dingos may be relatively harmless to humans, but cause considerable economic losses to graziers, killing sheep and calves, as well as domestic dogs. I know one farmer that has lost over 70 sheep in recent months. ~7000 dollars worth.


This is one of wikipedias better entries

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dingo
 
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Bartnmax

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IMO the native Australian Dingo is a beautiful animal & it's a shame they have been treated so harshly over the years.
Yes I know they have predated on domestic stock & have been viewed as a pest because of that, but we also need to remember it's us that are encroaching on ther territory, not t'other way around. Much of the killing that has been attributed to Dingoes has actually been caused by Feral dogs.
Feral dogs are another animal altogether. They are a considerable pest & cause enormous stock losses, especially in sheep farming areas.
Black is actually not a natural colour in the pure Dingo but has been bought about in wild Dingos that have crossed at some stage with domestic/feral dogs

In 2008-2009 myself & a mate shot close to 40 Feral dogs in the Far NE of Victoria. This in an area where a professional dogger was also making considerable inroads into their population. It's very un-nerving to lay awake at 3am & hear packs of wild dogs howling as they decend from the higher areas where they know they are safe, into the valleys where they feed on sheep & other domestic animals. It was also very saddening to go out hunting & find dear that had obviously fallen prey to the dogs. One time I even came cross a yearling Sambar that had managed to escape the dogs somehow but in the process had suffered severe cuts/bites with infection taking it's toll. As much as I normally dislike shooting yearling deer I had to put the poor beast down to end it's suffering. One woman that lived near my mates farm was actually attacked by several wild dogs when attending a Lambing Ewe one evening. She was badly bitten on the lower legs & was very lucky to get to the safety of her 4wd where she radiod for help. Her husband & my mate managed to shoot 3 of the wild dogs as they fled. Bloody wild, vicious, scrawny looking things they were with little or no fear of humans at all.
Fortunately the 09 bushfires decimated their ranks far better than pro & amateur shooters alike could. It appears that at least for now they have fled the area.
No doubt they are still a major problem else where tho.

Bill A.
 

auscraft

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This is what we found today near our place. This is what a farmer has done to warn other dingos off from attacking his stock or at least give them a meal not to enter the property. This is the first time we have seen this. It has been scalped from ears to tall, and mounted to fence post secured by wire.
View attachment 1212
 

Dusty Miller

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Not for the benefit of dingoes. The scalp is worth money when presented at local councils, there is a boutny in many shires. It is on the fence to make the job of skinning easier. Look carefully at the dogs in the earlier post and you will see that they have been similarly scalped.
 

auscraft

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I stand corrected, I was not aware of council rebate.
 

Hairyman

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A farmer/neighbour I spoke recently to says we now have a maremma running with the wild dogs.
The big problem with feral dogs breeding with dingoes is they may start breeding 2x per year and change their
relatively reclusive nature.
A few years ago a black feral dog with dingo companion was threatening a family member of mine in my own yard.
When the above farmer eventually shot it (after it killed his goat) it turned out to be a speyed(tat in ear) female.
 

Hairyman

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Here are two dingo skulls and a red fox skull for comparison.
Note the large sagittal crest for muscle attachment on the back of the dingo skulls.
In other ways dingo and fox skulls are amazingly similar, just different scales.

Picture 001.jpgPicture 002.jpgPicture 003.jpgPicture 004.jpgPicture 005.jpgPicture 006.jpgPicture 007.jpgPicture 009.jpg
 
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Hairyman

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The idea that dingoes exist in not only the "physical landscape, but also the psychological landscape of both indigenous and settler Australians" is an inertesting
angle to view them from.
 

Hairyman

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A red necked wallaby killed and partially eaten by dingoes.
Dingoes often seem to chew the flesh from the bones without breaking them, leaving the skeleton articulated, unlike domestic dogs.

DSCF2275 (640x502).jpg
 
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auscraft

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I spotted This one Yesterday near Thompson creek after it took off 20m away from me causing fright. I was able to keep my wits about me quickly repostioning myself to see if I could get a view of him when he stopped and tried viewing me.
This is first pic as he tried to see i had gone. No pic of first stumbling across him.
View attachment 8591
This is what happened when he spotted me taking the pics
View attachment 8592
 

Eco Hunter

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Hey everyone, I have just joined this site and this is my first post. Cheers Eco

Anyone wanting to further explore this topic should have a read of DINGO by Brad Purcell.


dingo brad percell.jpg
 
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Hairyman

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My daughter spotted this fine specimen trotting along beside the highway in Toolara State forest yesterday and we were able to ambush him on a side road for this pic
 
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