Bunya flour.

LincDK

Russell Coight
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It seems to be a truism that every 3 years you get a bumper crop of Bunya. This year is that year. Lots and lots of Bunya.

Has anyone tried their hand at making them into flour? Will experiment but thought I'd ask.

Options I see (after deshelling them)
- Blitz then dehydrate
- Halve or Quarter, dehydrate then blitz

In both instances I'll boil them first though maybe I shouldn't do that?

Any other ideas for keeping them over a longer period? I've heard the Aboriginals buried them to extend their shelf life.

Thoughts?
 

Aussie123

Never Alone In The Bush
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I boil, then freeze in serve size portions.

I haven't buried them, but have tried storing them in the fridge ... they don't seem to last too long there.
If you leave them out of the fridge, they seem to sprout; which is not a problem you can still eat them, but not so good for long term storage!

I haven't tried making flour with bunya, but I have with acorns. For acorns I pulp them fresh (blender with a small amount of water), then dry them out ... or if you can't wait you can use the pulp right out the blender ...
 

LincDK

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Thought I'd come back and share the results. Amazing. The Bunya dehydrated well and the flour is awesome. Here's some pics of the pre and post flour products.
Bunya_grains.jpgBunya_flour.jpg
 

Aussie123

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That looks great. What have you used the flour to make ?

I sometimes you may want to mix the bunya flour with regular flour, both to extend it (as was often done in the past) and to get the more glutinous properties of wheat flour, but still get the bunya flavour.
 

LincDK

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That's a good idea to mix it back with some standard flour. So far just pancakes but I want to try making some noodles (dried and wet). I might need to had some of the flour like you suggest to get the gluten stretch!
 

peter.robinson

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there's also some things like guar gum or xantham gum you might be able to mix in, to give the glutenous stickyness. mix them well through with the dry flour and then add the wet ingredients or they can clump and not mix through properly. we used to use them with a mix of rice flour and chickpea flour, neither of which have any natural glue in them, to make flat breads etc. Guar gum is more like a gluten texture.
 
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