Breadcrumbing methods?

goanywhere

Russell Coight
Joined
Aug 14, 2014
Messages
8
Reaction score
0
A skill that isn't mentioned much these days is breadcrumbing as an aid to back tracking. I have thought of using biodegradable fluorescent paint instead of broken twigs and stone piles. What methods do you use?
 

Hairyman

Ludwig Leichhardt
Archivist
Joined
Sep 13, 2011
Messages
4,032
Reaction score
225
Location
Ironbark, SEQ
Don't use bread crumbs .. the birds will eat them. ;-)

Seriously though, look back often as things look different going back, use your digital camera to take pics of the track. I take pics of the track signs at the entrance to
national park tracks for later reference on the walk.
 

auscraft

Henry Arthur Readford
Joined
May 23, 2011
Messages
4,596
Reaction score
334
Location
jjj
I take pics as well, and agree look back often, GPS tracking.
If I use anything it is flagging tape , nothing that wildlife can eat also flag tap can be hung at eye level.
 

Mozzie

Richard Proenneke
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Mar 26, 2012
Messages
1,543
Reaction score
112
Location
Wollongong NSW
I take photos of the signs at track starts as well, i take notice of things that look different, an ant hill, a fallen tree, etc. I also walk past these and look at them in the other direction, if i have to leave markers it will be a stick snapped in the middle (short term marker). Also i carry red flag tape or a GPS if the going will be tough (dense scrub). On a walk we did last year the old markers in a section were hard to locate or near on rotten away, so we used our red tags to replace the old ones.
 

biggles1024

Rüdiger Nehberg
Joined
May 9, 2012
Messages
973
Reaction score
11
I don't want to take this thread off topic, but could those who mark tracks with tape please tell me exactly what tape they're using? I've looked into it and bio-degradable tape from the likes of Coghlans seems to be the stuff that many are using. It also appears that this form of marking is most popular with hunters in the US.
 

Aussie123

Never Alone In The Bush
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Jun 16, 2011
Messages
5,120
Reaction score
93
Location
Melbourne, Victoria
I don't want to take this thread off topic, but could those who mark tracks with tape please tell me exactly what tape they're using? I've looked into it and bio-degradable tape from the likes of Coghlans seems to be the stuff that many are using. It also appears that this form of marking is most popular with hunters in the US.
I've used fluro builders tape (from the hardware shop). This is not biodegradable, so you need to pick it up on the way out.
Some people use toilet paper as a biodegradable marker. I guess coloured crepe paper could be used too
 

auscraft

Henry Arthur Readford
Joined
May 23, 2011
Messages
4,596
Reaction score
334
Location
jjj
Flagging tape also called survey tape you tie it onto things is not an adhesive type tape (masking,gaffer tape) .
I also use it trapping to mark locations, also to allow visual if a blind set in sand has been activated.
 

Thrud

Richard Proenneke
Joined
Mar 9, 2013
Messages
2,031
Reaction score
259
Location
Perth, WA
Unfortunately the mountain biking/off road/runners mark with the flagging tape. Which they do not remove.

Last weekend on the Eagle View walk the metal marking posts had been sprayed with fluorescent permanent spray...unbelievable!

In the navigation books the points that have been made above about looking back occasionally are also mentioned; a very useful technique, though I can understand there is some bush that is not suitable for this technique.

Rant over.
 

thejungleisneutral

Walkabout
Joined
Mar 18, 2014
Messages
479
Reaction score
56
Location
Southern Tablelands, NSW
I'm a bit anti-flagging tape. Usually when I see it in national parks, I remove it unless it's marking something specific and official like NPWS or university research equipment (insect traps and the like). It's a conservation area, not some rogainer's/charity walker's/mountain bike rider's playground. These types need to learn that just like the rest of us, they are guests in national parks and if they bring rubbish in to these areas they need to take it out again.

Small rock cairns are an unobtrusive and traditional method of marking decision-points and that's what I use on the rare occasions I actually mark my backtrail. Other helpful methods are sticks laid out as signals, scrapes in the dirt/sand/leaf litter. I have heard of coloured chalk being used. Since it will wash off after a couple of rains I guess that's an acceptable method.

Taking a photo is a good method of "remembering" your backtrail. I've done it a few times in complex terrain.
 

koalaboi

Mors Kochanski
Joined
Dec 11, 2011
Messages
395
Reaction score
30
The best uses for breadcrumbs are as follows;

1. Bait poddy mullet trap with breadcrumbs and use poddies to catch flathead.
2. Fillet flathead, roll in flour, dip in beaten egg and roll in breadcrumbs then shallow fry in olive oil,

Breadcrumbs are also useful as stuffing for poultry (add a bit of everything else: bacon, onions, olives, tomatoes, dried tomatoes, salt & pepper, grated cheese....) and making a crumbly crust on a range of baked dishes.

Breadcrumbs...wonderful things!

KB
 

biggles1024

Rüdiger Nehberg
Joined
May 9, 2012
Messages
973
Reaction score
11
Thanks to all who responded with advice RE trail marking tape.
 

goanywhere

Russell Coight
Joined
Aug 14, 2014
Messages
8
Reaction score
0
Thanks for all that. I think flagging tape is probably as good as anything. I am thinking that if you mark a track with something like flagging or masking tape that you collect it again on your way back. Water soluble paint might be a good idea (kid's face paint?) as long as you don't intend to backtrack after many days of incessant rain.

I also carry a GPS, but I got very lost once when my GPS died and I forgot the way back over very same-looking trackless ground. Ended up spending a night in the open without fire or sleeping gear. Had to get through a cold night by breaking off a huge mound of leafy twigs off the surrounding bushes and burying myself in it. I got through but I developed a real interest in bushcraft and preparedness for ANY walking in unfamiliar territory after that. A roll of masking tape or similar used to mark frequent "line of sight" points would have saved me a lot of discomfort. I now take a minimal survival day pack with me when venturing far from known ground, and have been breadcrumbing with stones and sticks like others have said, but sometimes even these can be missed in some terrain unless you are careful.
 

auscraft

Henry Arthur Readford
Joined
May 23, 2011
Messages
4,596
Reaction score
334
Location
jjj
"I'm a bit anti-flagging tape. Usually when I see it in national parks, I remove it unless it's marking something specific and official like NPWS or university research equipment (insect traps and the like). "
I am like you even though I use flagging tape I don't like seeing it everywhere, so I do pull mine down if I use it.

However I do not interfere with anyone else's tape for the simple reason I am not aware or the reason it is posted safety , marking , backtracking or any other reasons it may be used for. I will remove flagging not tied or drifting across ground but I a will not interfere with a possible safety marker. I also find the tape does not get disturb by slackers as much as stone or sticks piles usually see these things disturbed which would be pointless if using them as safety markers
IMO
 

Aussie123

Never Alone In The Bush
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Jun 16, 2011
Messages
5,120
Reaction score
93
Location
Melbourne, Victoria
"I'm a bit anti-flagging tape. Usually when I see it in national parks, I remove it unless it's marking something specific and official like NPWS or university research equipment (insect traps and the like). "
I am like you even though I use flagging tape I don't like seeing it everywhere, so I do pull mine down if I use it.

However I do not interfere with anyone else's tape for the simple reason I am not aware or the reason it is posted safety , marking , backtracking or any other reasons it may be used for. I will remove flagging not tied or drifting across ground but I a will not interfere with a possible safety marker. I also find the tape does not get disturb by slackers as much as stone or sticks piles usually see these things disturbed which would be pointless if using them as safety markers
IMO
Good point Auscraft. I'm always careful to remove any tape I use, so I only use if if I'm coming back the same way, and I only use it if I "need it" for some reason.

You never know why tape may have been put somewhere, so I wouldn't interfere with tape attached to something,
but if its just lying on the ground I'd treat it like rubbish - IMO markers are like : "leave the gates how you find them"
 

auscraft

Henry Arthur Readford
Joined
May 23, 2011
Messages
4,596
Reaction score
334
Location
jjj
How is a persons safety marker rubbish ? How can you be sure you are not interfering with someone or something of importance to the forestry or an individual ?
 

Aussie123

Never Alone In The Bush
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Jun 16, 2011
Messages
5,120
Reaction score
93
Location
Melbourne, Victoria
I'm a bit anti-flagging tape. Usually when I see it in national parks, I remove it unless it's marking something specific and official like NPWS or university research equipment (insect traps and the like).

.....

It's rubbish in a national park and therefore fair game.
I agree - flagging tape can be just another form of rubbish and something which "bushwalkers" should not abandon - that IS rubbish, but ...

... how can "you" tell which markers are "research" markers (etc) and which are rubbish ?
 
Top