Best water proof jacket for hiking

Diddymao

Russell Coight
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I'm looking to get a light weight rain jacket around the$100-$150 price range.
Any one got any ideas?
So many out there but I really don't know where to start.
 

Wentworth

Bear Mears
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Hi Diddymao,
If you're walking in or the Blue Mountains, I second Thrud's suggestion of a poncho.

I've used this goretex paclite jacket since 2012 for walks above the tree line, but it's too warm for local walks

 

Redtail

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I'll "third" Thrud and Wentowrth's suggestions. Go a poncho or similar, and just layer up to keep warm.
 

Diddymao

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Yeah it looks like the poncho will keep a lot more of me dry than a traditional jacket, a lot cheaper and lighter as well😊
 

Aussie123

Never Alone In The Bush
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There are some great ponchos about, I have a cheapie and its OK, but I've been looking at some bigger, better, lighter ones (a particular sil-nylon one at about $120 and very light and compact, but a very generous cut - 'cuase I'm tall)

One thing I don't like about the poncho is it flapping about when its windy, I usually have my pack inside the poncho, so I don't / cant use the belt to control it.
Also my sleeves tend to get wet, perhaps that's just me (I don't walk with any other poncho wearers to know) ?

But the ventilation is great, even with a cheap nylon version.
 

MongooseDownUnder

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I use a ventile poncho, I tried a nylon poncho once and it got shredded. The old (post Vietnam) Australian army rain coats are not too bad as they are quite open.
 

RottenHopeless

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I can vouch for the trusted poncho too, both from military experience and personal hiking. My last disposal store poncho died after nearly 20 years of use. I like the ease of throwing them over both myself and my pack when that unexpected Blue Mountains storm is about to hit. Have been looking at the different ones out there now and am currently considering getting a Dutch Army DPM poncho. Not only do I prefer the nylon over polyester, but I can also get the matching liner for the colder walks. This combination will work a lot better for me than the current Mayday emergency poncho I have in my Osprey day pack 😄
 

Randall

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Just on the off chance you're not somewhere warm; If it's warm, goretex etc will struggle with the extra condensation / sweat. I have a rab kinetic for when I'm not up against rock or scrub. It's awesome. It has the best hood I've ever used. I think it was designed for climbing. I have worn it in all day rain and wind in alpine country and was warm and dry (well below zero). I got it at a great price (for what it is), it packs small, minimal pockets / bulk. They are expensive; for where I live it is a good thing to spend money on. If I was on the mainland - I wouldn't put an emphasis here (unless I lived close to kosciusko, or baw baw, or any of the ski field areas). You can also get it here. Poncho sounds awesome if it is warm and not too windy, not climbing etc.
 
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Markie D

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Personally I would go for a poncho, unless you will be at altitude. Virtually all synthetic waterproof garments are expensive moisture traps ....I rate the snug pak patrol poncho.
Yeah i agree, ponchos can be quite light weight and can also double as a tarp to make a small rain shelter.
I use scotchgard on my flannelette shirts to make them semi waterproof good for light rain, I am a sparky, so i wear them at work when working in light rain, they are also not too bulky so you can move around in them, they are also quite warm and pack away pretty small too. and not being synthetic they are safe when around the camp fire too.
 

Bushdoc

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The old auscam japara is good. Big pockets, lightweight. Built-in hood. Drawstrings.
Plastic ones get a bit brittle with age.
 
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