Bell's Rapids and Mount Mambup

Thrud

Richard Proenneke
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Tried out the Ribz today(separate post)
Not a breath of wind.
Lot of big grey roos
Low river levels.ImageUploadedByTapatalk1365909640.965097.jpgImageUploadedByTapatalk1365909663.896523.jpgImageUploadedByTapatalk1365909679.196854.jpgImageUploadedByTapatalk1365909700.902221.jpgImageUploadedByTapatalk1365909739.596579.jpgImageUploadedByTapatalk1365909768.662957.jpgImageUploadedByTapatalk1365909788.028356.jpgImageUploadedByTapatalk1365909827.806270.jpg
 

Hairyman

Ludwig Leichhardt
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Great to see some different places.
What does the 'up' mean on the end of a lot of place names in WA?
Mountain, hill?
Thanks for posting Thrud.
 

Thrud

Richard Proenneke
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ImageUploadedByTapatalk1365938783.265789.jpg
It is new growth on a Balga or grass tree (xanthorrhoea preissii) looked like it had been nibbled by something...
 
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Hairyman

Ludwig Leichhardt
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More of a resin than a gum, I dont think its edible but it smells really nice when heated.
 

Bloffy13

Jon Muir
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Great photos Thrud.
There are many places that end in "up"
Yunderup, Pingrup Kojonup, Gnowangerup etc.
Further out in the Wheatbelt, the suffix "in" has a similar meaning, such as Wagin, Narrogin, Condinin etc.
I think but am not 100 per cent sure the gum was used as a fixitive for holding items in place like the tips on woomeras etc
Cheers
Bloffy
 

Doc

Rüdiger Nehberg
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That area & surrounds is a regular hammocking venue for Ukeekwan & myself. Must have a WA get together sometime soon!
 

Redtail

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Great photos Thrud.
There are many places that end in "up"
Yunderup, Pingrup Kojonup, Gnowangerup etc.
Further out in the Wheatbelt, the suffix "in" has a similar meaning, such as Wagin, Narrogin, Condinin etc.
I think but am not 100 per cent sure the gum was used as a fixitive for holding items in place like the tips on woomeras etc
Cheers
Bloffy
And some white settlers were known to make up their own names for places, taking the mickey - e.g. Buggerup, Mumballup and so on. Often it's hard to get the original meaning. From memory, Wagin come from Waich (emu) place. Gnow (mallee fowl) gives us Gnowangerup.

Grass tree resin, finely ground, mixed with charcoal and roo poo (for the grass fibre) when heated makes a very strong epoxy like glue. I've only seen it demonstrated once by a local Nyoongar, and not yet tried it myself. IIRC the ratio is 3:2:1 resin/charcoal/scat. But the quartz flints he set into the resin on stout stick made a very strong knife/saw.
 

Redtail

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Thank you :D
I've just looked it up; it sounds like a really useful plant to have around :cool: Is the gum edible or is it used as a glue ?

Toddy
The flower stem can grow to around 1.5m. It's thin, strong and straight. I believe that part is very useful for making sticks for a friction fire.
As for the bits broken off, it's most likely local kids snapping them off. All to common in a popular area like that one. The Nyoongar people would use those leaves/fronds as matting in their mia-mias (shelters).
 
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