Beginner knife user - how should I be using my Mora companion?

Bloodwood

Russell Coight
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Hey all,

First post, and a bit of a foolish one at that. I bought a Mora companion a few months back, and it's my first proper knife. I used it a few weeks ago to strip the bark and level some of the knots on a Eucalypt hiking staff I was making, and didn't notice until now that the blade is now chipped in at least two places. Is this normal, and if so, am I using the wrong sort of knife for cutting wood? What's the Mora companion meant to be used for?

Cheers,
Chris / Bloodwood
 

Le Loup

Rüdiger Nehberg
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Hey all,

First post, and a bit of a foolish one at that. I bought a Mora companion a few months back, and it's my first proper knife. I used it a few weeks ago to strip the bark and level some of the knots on a Eucalypt hiking staff I was making, and didn't notice until now that the blade is now chipped in at least two places. Is this normal, and if so, am I using the wrong sort of knife for cutting wood? What's the Mora companion meant to be used for?

Cheers,
Chris / Bloodwood
Firstly knives were never meant to be used for hacking & chopping, tomahawks & hand axes are the tools for that. Different knives have, or at least used to have, different purposes. Your companion knife I am assuming was perhaps designed for camp chores, fashioning kettle hooks, cutting cordage, skinning poles, making animal traps. Knots on wood can be very hard, & care needs to be taken not to twist the blade in an effort to lever some wood away, shaving & careful cutting only. I can not attest to the quality of the Mora blade, I only ever use old carbon steel blades. I have a hunting knife for skinning & butchering & self defence, I have a legging knife which is a back-up to my hunting knife, I have an Opinel clasp knife for camp chores, & of course a tomahawk for shelter construction, as an aid in butchering if needs be, for throwing as entertainment & practice for hunting & self defence.
Tools of the Trade  020.JPG
Keith.
 

Bloodwood

Russell Coight
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Firstly knives were never meant to be used for hacking & chopping, tomahawks & hand axes are the tools for that. Different knives have, or at least used to have, different purposes. Your companion knife I am assuming was perhaps designed for camp chores, fashioning kettle hooks, cutting cordage, skinning poles, making animal traps. Knots on wood can be very hard, & care needs to be taken not to twist the blade in an effort to lever some wood away, shaving & careful cutting only. I can not attest to the quality of the Mora blade, I only ever use old carbon steel blades. I have a hunting knife for skinning & butchering & self defence, I have a legging knife which is a back-up to my hunting knife, I have an Opinel clasp knife for camp chores, & of course a tomahawk for shelter construction, as an aid in butchering if needs be, for throwing as entertainment & practice for hunting & self defence.
View attachment 28172
Keith.
Thanks a lot for your reply. The companion is carbon steel and meant to be suitable for carving but I think I was a bit too heavy handed with the knots, which were definitely the hardest piece of wood I've ever encountered. Your collection is awesome! I have an antler that I found on a hike years ago - one of these days I'm going to make a knife handle out of it...
 
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Le Loup

Rüdiger Nehberg
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Thanks a lot for your reply. The companion is carbon steel and meant to be suitable for carving but I think I was a bit too heavy handed with the knots, which were definitely the hardest piece of wood I've ever encountered. Your collection is awesome! I have an antler that I found in a good years ago - one of these days I'm going to make a knife handle out of it...
I very much appreciate your reply Bloodwood. I look forward to seeing your re-handling using the deer antler sometime in the future.
Sincere regards, Keith.
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Thrud

Richard Proenneke
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Thanks for your post and welcome to the forum. No such thing a foolish post!
When you say chipped, is it a chip or has the edge rolled?
Keith has probably forgotten more about knives than I'll ever know, and I agree that the knots are probably the cause. I rolled the edges on my Real Steel scandi grind folder. I then put a micro bevel and have not had this issue again.
Can you post a pic?
Enjoy your bushcrafting journey!
 

Bloodwood

Russell Coight
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Thanks for your post and welcome to the forum. No such thing a foolish post!
When you say chipped, is it a chip or has the edge rolled?
Keith has probably forgotten more about knives than I'll ever know, and I agree that the knots are probably the cause. I rolled the edges on my Real Steel scandi grind folder. I then put a micro bevel and have not had this issue again.
Can you post a pic?
Enjoy your bushcrafting journey!
Yes a photo probably would help! I'd say it's a chip. Another factor might be that I only have a cheap knife sharpener, so the edge might not have been even.
 

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Aussie123

Never Alone In The Bush
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Its a chip alright ! But you should be able to sharpen it away.

It is difficult to know, but the blade should be able to clean up a stick without getting damaged .... so perhaps technique was an issue.

Its good to practice with a Mora, make mistakes, damage a blade, learn to sharpen etc before spending a fortune on another knife.
My day-pack knife is a Bahco (which is a mora re-badge). Its light weight, inexpensive and does everything I need it to do ... I have some fancy knives, but i only take them when I plan to use them
 

Askew

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Welcome to the forum!
Doesn't look too bad. It might not have been bad technique, the factory edge on Mora's can be a bit variable due to overheating during the final grinding.
 

Kindliing

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Hi,
If that happened to my knife I would run / cut the knife on some concrete until it’s ground down past the chips.
I’ve done that many times before , then once it’s past the chips put a new edge on it with the stone.
 

Randall

Rüdiger Nehberg
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Mora's are so popular because they are good, strong, cheap users. You're using it :ROFLMAO:. I wouldn't worry about the chips etc. I would try to keep it sharp, without trying to grind out those chips. Trying to grind out the chips will just waste lots of knife life. I found a nice kitchen carving knife in the garden; the spine had been hammered and it had nicks and edge buckles. It is now shaving sharp but still has those nicks and edge buckles in it, although they are getting smaller. It doesn't affect it's use that I can tell, and it's now my favorite kitchen knife. It is cheap steel but a great size and shape - I just have to strop it a fair bit more.

The edge of yours looks as though you're using a pull through knife sharpener. Lucky it's a cheap knife :oops:. You've created a secondary bevel now and no longer have the benefit of a scandi.

Scandi grinds are supposedly easy to sharpen - I have a couple and I have to focus and work the rounded part (near the point) separately. The rounded parts on mine have gradually different bevel angles (more obtuse) as they approach the points. This is probably a mute point for you now - to get yours back to a scandi bevel will take a lot of time and you'll have to remove a lot of steel. It's probably best to keep going with the new bevel you've created - which should make for a stronger bushcrafting edge anyway - it just won't slice / cut as well.

Get rid of the pull through sharpener though - I believe it is responsible for most of the edge damage you have.

I bought a Fallkniven dc4 stone - it is big enough for me to feel the bevel on my scandi's and it gets good reviews. It's also small enough to travel with.

fallkniven dc4.jpg
 
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Kindliing

Les Hiddins
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I’d stick the Scandinavian grind back on it , can’t see a couple mm changing much life wise.
An abattoir worker taught me that trick to remove chips years ago when I was a young fella .
 

Wentworth

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Welcome to the forum Bloodwood!

You might find this article by Robin Wood interesting regarding factory standard microbevels on frosts moras:

The author is an interesting guy who carves a lot of props for historical movies, including the Russell Crowe Robin Hood movie.

I've found that a microbevel helps a fair bit when carving our hardwoods, which can be knotty and resinous compared softer European woods.

Having dinged the edges on my zero grind scandis, I was able to grind them out fairly easily. Both the mora carbon and their sandvik stainless are easy to work with so you'll be fine.
 

Wave Man

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that is why every one says buy a Mora, it's because they are inexpensive and they are quality. It's good you are using yours.

I don't have anything to add to the sharpening bit. I am no sharpener so I can't offer an opinion.
 
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