Bamboo tube with lid

Aussie123

Never Alone In The Bush
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Bamboo is not native in Victoria, and large bamboo is rarely grown at all, however a neighbor was disposing of some larger than usual bamboo so a grabbed a few stems to play with.

This is actually from the tip of a stem, the base is a bit wider, but nothing like in tropics ...

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I used a hacksaw blade to score the end section, then a carving knife to remove the outer section from the lower piece,
and the inner bit from the lid piece (upper):
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Although small, it was lovely to carve the green bamboo and was quite easy to cut.
Next time I'm up north, I'll be looking more closely at some bamboo clumps ... see what I can make.

Byleaving some extra length beyond the node on the top and bottom I made a hole and threaded some cord.
This has the benefit that you can't lose or drop the bits, and you can carry the tube and its own wright keeps the lid on ...
(well its a tight fit anyway and there isn't much weight in this particular tube, but a bigger tube ..... _
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Aussie123

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Nice container for some tinder or something like that!


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It would be great for tinder, also bone needles, spunks and more ... any kind of fiddly bits ...

I saw someone drill the lids to make salt and pepper containers too !
 

Requiem

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Recently harvested some fallen bamboo for a wind chime project. Bamboo was green and when placed in the sun to dry began to split, even though the pieces were already cut open along their length. Since then I’ve seen some posts about using open flame to sear(?) and set the oils in the green outer layer to help avoid splitting. In the end, I waited for a rainy day for the pieces to swell and close some of the cracks, the used some jute twine to tightly wrap close to the cracks and used craft glue over the wraps to prevent any slippage. Very nice effect. I don’t recommend trying to sand the green layer off and applying raw linseed oil; very patchy and dark absorption even after multiple coatings. The only time I ended up with a good result was with a piece that I split away from the outer layer and used as the sail. As it was the heart of the bamboo wall (no inner or outer layers) it took the linseed oil nicely.
 

Aussie123

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Thanks for the info Requiem.

I didn't see much online about drying and splitting, so assumed it must be OK.
I've made quite a few tubes, a sheath, storage "jars" (no cap), arrow heads ... Its still quite green so I'll wait and see what happens
 

Requiem

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Storage jars with lids for dry goods in the kitchen are on my list of things to make next. Splitting is a common issue for Japanese flute makers and they have a number of interesting forums on the subject. Decorative wrapping seems to be the go to way to deal with it for them. Bamboo fences also seem to draw the ire of many due to cracking and mould so there’s a lot out there too on treating bamboo with fire or chemicals.
 

wildnfree

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Nice container but I think it's quite small for storing water
 

Aussie123

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Some arrow heads and a set of tent pegs:

Carved, but not separated as yet:
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Separated:
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The tent pegs. The point is on a node where the wood is hard and dense. This "should" be more robust.
There is also a node 2 - 3 cm from the top of the pegs, this should act as a catch for the string.
20181103_175719 (Medium).jpg
The convex nature of the bamboo will supposedly stiffen and strengthen the pegs.
 
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