Australian WWII Survival Training Film - "Living Off The Land" 1944

thejungleisneutral

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[video=youtube;EP_rGYih55I]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EP_rGYih55I[/video]

Film "stars" Q220105 Major VH Chargois, 2IC of the far north Queensland 17th Bn Volunteer Defence Corps. Chargois was one of the Army's foremost bush tucker experts during WWII and ran survival courses in the Cairns area for AIF and Militia troops as well as for Australian, US and Dutch aircrew, special forces and special intelligence personnel.

The film was produced using the syllabus of Chargois' Special Forces Jungle Food Course and was filmed in Cairns, Mossman and the Yungaburra area on the Atherton Tableland.

The film details many types of bush tucker plants found in Northern Queensland and around the Pacific. Importantly, it also provides information on water procurement, firemaking and signalling.

Appears to be Reel 1 of a longer film.
 

Aussie123

Never Alone In The Bush
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Why is it that in all films from this era everyone speaks like a Pom and a generation later its 'strine?
In the "olden days" it was thought that "public figures" (like announcers) should demonstrate how to speak properly - the King's English and all that !
I guess it was meant as an example for us all, and perhaps so that if we met a stranger, it would be easier to see that they had good breeding behind them, and we could treat them as they were entitled to be. :;):

Most mainstream news presenters still have quite "plummy" voices - so we 'strains can understand them, no matter what part of the bush we're from :_risata: ; but you may notice (esp) some UK documentaries use regional accented people now (I hope that's politically correct ?) !
 

Brit bushcrafter

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you may notice (esp) some UK documentaries use regional accented people now
I have noticed the plum in the mouth change over here in the last 20 years or so. We have Northern and Welsh presenters on TV now which you would never have heard back then.
 

koalaboi

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Hi,

The changes in accents you hear on old films are not restricted to professional speakers. You'll also hear them when ordinary people are interviewed on old news footage.

It is an indication of the fact that language is dynamic and constantly evolving: both the words and idiom that we use as well as our accents and other aspects of language.

Really, it's pretty fascinating.

KB
 
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