Australian Plant & Fungi Tinders for Tinderbox Fire Lighting.

Le Loup

John McDouall Stuart
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[video=youtube;6dJDCWobUDQ]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6dJDCWobUDQ[/video]
[video=youtube;TsB1BJnYbKA]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TsB1BJnYbKA[/video]
[video=youtube;4XD4Ux4KAQQ]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4XD4Ux4KAQQ[/video]
[video=youtube;WBQpah-wJhk]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WBQpah-wJhk[/video]
[video=youtube;T6stn39v-fw]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T6stn39v-fw[/video]
Keith.
 

kiwibro

Mors Kochanski
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Would the Scarlett bracket (Pycnoporus coccineus) be any good for this purpose?
I have access to a heap of it
 

Le Loup

John McDouall Stuart
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Would the Scarlett bracket (Pycnoporus coccineus) be any good for this purpose?
I have access to a heap of it
I think that the Pycnoporus coccineus is in fact a polypore, & I know it was used for medicinal purposes (mouth ulcers), but I have not seen any round here & I don't know if it will work as tinder. All the tinders I list & use I found by experimentation, I did no research beforehand. I can only suggest that you find some Pycnoporus coccineus dried & char it directly in the fire & see if it will catch a spark. If you do try it, I would very much like to hear of your results kiwibro.
Regards, Keith.
 

kiwibro

Mors Kochanski
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Thanks Le Loup.

Tried some today. Can’t see it being any good for fire keeping but works good for fire lighting. Got really hot in the tinder pile. Only collected them off the tree yesterday morning and they spent the night above the fire drying.


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Le Loup

John McDouall Stuart
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Thanks Le Loup.

Tried some today. Can’t see it being any good for fire keeping but works good for fire lighting. Got really hot in the tinder pile. Only collected them off the tree yesterday morning and they spent the night above the fire drying.


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I am not familiar with the term "fire keeping" kiwibro, does it work as tinder? Once charred, will it catch a spark from flint & steel?
Keith.
 

kiwibro

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I am not familiar with the term "fire keeping" kiwibro, does it work as tinder? Once charred, will it catch a spark from flint & steel?
Keith.

I meant fire keeping as in transporting fire.
It does work as tinder. Have only tried with a ferro rod though. It doesn’t smolder slowly. It quite quickly builds to a good coal.
Will have a play next week see if it will take a steel spark.


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Le Loup

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I meant fire keeping as in transporting fire.
It does work as tinder. Have only tried with a ferro rod though. It doesn’t smolder slowly. It quite quickly builds to a good coal.
Will have a play next week see if it will take a steel spark.


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Ah, okay, good one. Thank you. I must keep my eyes open for other fungi & do some more experimenting. Looking forward to more information on your own experimenting kiwibro.
Regards, Keith.
 

Chigger

Les Hiddins
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Following all these discussions on fungi for fire lighting have keep looking about for some however with little success. So was surprised as was driving down a country road I have travelled hundreds of times to a friends farm and lo and behold there was this white thing sitting up on a tree right beside the road.

Pulled it down and at home left it in the sun for a few days to make sure it was properly dried out.

Cut one small slice off and tried to light it with flint and steel with no success. Gave the piece a char on my gas stove (no fireplace available here) and retried with flint and steel.

Certainly an excellent puck once charred, caught a spark easily and started glowing very quickly.

Will prepare a larger piece for my tinderbox, hopefully will be camping out next week and will give the fungi a good try out.

Don't know the correct name of this fungi, these latin names have me lost.

Fungus.jpg
 

Le Loup

John McDouall Stuart
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Following all these discussions on fungi for fire lighting have keep looking about for some however with little success. So was surprised as was driving down a country road I have travelled hundreds of times to a friends farm and lo and behold there was this white thing sitting up on a tree right beside the road.

Pulled it down and at home left it in the sun for a few days to make sure it was properly dried out.

Cut one small slice off and tried to light it with flint and steel with no success. Gave the piece a char on my gas stove (no fireplace available here) and retried with flint and steel.

Certainly an excellent puck once charred, caught a spark easily and started glowing very quickly.

Will prepare a larger piece for my tinderbox, hopefully will be camping out next week and will give the fungi a good try out.

Don't know the correct name of this fungi, these latin names have me lost.

View attachment 25429
The Latin names don't really matter Chigger, this is a bracket fungus & it is a member of the polypore family. There are several species & they all look very similar, all are bracket fungus. The main thing is that you now know what it looks like so you know what to look for.
I wrote this following article a few years ago Chigger, you might find it of interest. https://woodsrunnersdiary.blogspot.com/2015/10/the-polypore-fungus-tinder-for-flint.html
Well done Chigger, good find.
Keith.
 

Chigger

Les Hiddins
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Thanks for the link Keith which I have read and bookmarked for future reference. Very clear explanation. Stringybark trees are about here in the Central Tablelands but not too prolific and in the places I go seem to be in isolated pockets.

The fungi I found was not on a stringybark think the tree was a yellow box.

The charred fungi only needs a bit of a spark to get it glowing as mentioned and hopeful to try it out in the field in a day or two.

Keeping my eyes open for more fungi.
 
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