Aussie Gear?

Qually

Lofty Wiseman
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I came across this on my Pinterest feed. It was listed as an Aussie pack, Wilderness Bound. Anyone shed any light on it? Screen Shot 2019-01-30 at 10.44.06 pm.jpg Screen Shot 2019-01-30 at 10.39.22 pm.jpg
 

Walker

John McDouall Stuart
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It looks like a 'pretend' pack, that is, a cheap copy of an original Paddymade rucksack.

What gives it away is the top flap is too short to cover gear when overloaded - the eyelets in the straps show that.

Also, the flaps on the pockets wouldn't stop stuff falling in/out when full - the lid design is incorrect.

Importantly, where's the all important photo of the harness? No waist belt?

Always amuses me when I see more gear strapped on the outside of a pack than what can fit inside.

It may be good for meandering around in open country or on tracks, but not for scrub, etc.
 

Qually

Lofty Wiseman
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It looks like a 'pretend' pack, that is, a cheap copy of an original Paddymade rucksack.

What gives it away is the top flap is too short to cover gear when overloaded - the eyelets in the straps show that.

Also, the flaps on the pockets wouldn't stop stuff falling in/out when full - the lid design is incorrect.

Importantly, where's the all important photo of the harness? No waist belt?

Always amuses me when I see more gear strapped on the outside of a pack than what can fit inside.

It may be good for meandering around in open country or on tracks, but not for scrub, etc.
I can agree with some of your points, however, the lid is almost identical, to the german alpine pack, as are the front pocket lids(german pack considered a bushcraft classic). Most of the leather straps appear to be stitched and copper riveted, which is usually a sign that a modicum of effort and thought has gone into it. Packs like this are generally thought of to be in the "scout" type category. These packs are generally small and have many tie out points for extra gear if needed, as this does, top, bottom and side tie down points. High range outdoor packs are a good example of this ethic.The photo does not show the harness. I'd agree, but i'd say it looks like a decent scout/day pack design from the photo.
 

koalaboi

Mors Kochanski
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Background to picture looks very un-Australian!

Hard to tell quality unless close ups of stitching, interior and ventral side of pack.

KB
 

Randall

Ray Mears
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It is appealing to a classic type look. Packs used to be made like this and using leather straps and brass buckles because they didn't have anything better. Paddy Palin had one called "flinders ranges" or something like that, which is appropriate because the Flinders Ranges are hot and dry. Leather isn't much chop when it gets wet and needs treating - nylon couldn't care less about water. Actually, the paddy pallin packs were more dumpy (higher volume squat things) like the alice pack that the army used to use. This pack kind of reminds me of what the Union and Confederate soldiers used in the American Civil war (similar size and shape)
 
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Walker

John McDouall Stuart
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The German design was a classic in Europe but not very useful here.

People like Paddy Palin took that design and modified it for our conditions - more rain than snow, thick scrub rather than open forest and alpine meadows, jungle to desert not just temperate or snowy peaks.

The mods included heavier canvas, more contoured and longer lids to protect contents, a bit less leather, larger volume for real expedition load carrying.

A few bushwalking club members still used them back in the 80's when first generation synthetic packs started to be cost effective and more robust. But the old packs were more nostalgic than useful even then - heavy, uncomfortable, lousy frame, and the skinny leather straps were always a weak point.

It didn't take long for them to be relegated to day walk use or put up for sale in club magazines.

Strapping stuff on the outside of packs is personal preference, but it's very risky - damage/loss of gear, leaving bits of junk in the bush, etc. The only time stuff is typically on the outside is above the tree line in snow conditions.
 

Qually

Lofty Wiseman
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The German design was a classic in Europe but not very useful here.

People like Paddy Palin took that design and modified it for our conditions - more rain than snow, thick scrub rather than open forest and alpine meadows, jungle to desert not just temperate or snowy peaks.

The mods included heavier canvas, more contoured and longer lids to protect contents, a bit less leather, larger volume for real expedition load carrying.

A few bushwalking club members still used them back in the 80's when first generation synthetic packs started to be cost effective and more robust. But the old packs were more nostalgic than useful even then - heavy, uncomfortable, lousy frame, and the skinny leather straps were always a weak point.

It didn't take long for them to be relegated to day walk use or put up for sale in club magazines.

Strapping stuff on the outside of packs is personal preference, but it's very risky - damage/loss of gear, leaving bits of junk in the bush, etc. The only time stuff is typically on the outside is above the tree line in snow conditions.
[/QU
Background to picture looks very un-Australian!

Hard to tell quality unless close ups of stitching, interior and ventral side of pack.

KB
Looks like pretty much all plantation forests that I have been in in Australia, but I agree in that it isn't native bush.
 

Qually

Lofty Wiseman
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This is very interesting. It would appear that we have moved away from the traditional type bushcraft pack that was so very popular a few years back in the "bushcraft" world. Canvas and leather has never really been a practical choice in the modern era, but it used to be overlooked for the 'Feel" of the gear. I was never one of those that went that route, preferring lightweight modern materials in my pack, that was also modern and lightweight. The idea of carrying a 4kg Frost River pack (empty weight) because it looked nice was either for short trip canoe campers or urban bush crafters in my mind. These things will always have their peak popularity periods. Have we reached that point when it comes to traditional gear I wonder. When I posted the original pack, I was just wondering about the pack, but the reply has me wondering if we have matured somewhat when it comes to practical gear choices.
 

Randall

Ray Mears
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When I first started walking, there were still people using flinders ranges packs and paddy pallin tents (canvas a frame, no floor, make your own poles :) ). I don't think they even had hip harness. If you're talking big loads, that's where modern packs really come in - hip loading and harness in general. Canvas has been back in with high end packs for a while - wilderness equipment and forget the other one. I always take the canvas one when I'm bush bashing - it's just tough and never holes or tears. It is a modern design pack though, great harness and back pads for air circulation etc.
 
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