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Aussie fatwood

Wave Man

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how to make fatwood candles
[video=youtube;NHeioG6TWBM]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NHeioG6TWBM&feature=g-u&context=G2a71b35FUAAAAAAABAA[/video]
 

AussiePreppers

Richard Proenneke
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White Cypress Pine is my favourite, particularly for the aroma and insect / rot resisting properties. As for how useful is this when there's abundant tinder elsewhere? Can't hurt to have a stick of this in your fire tin for those tricky situations, like rain, wind, etc. I've found a fatwood 'torch' can often be great for heating up a larger bundle of wet tinder to the point of combustion which can in turn heat up wet kindling enough to get the best chance of a sustainable fire.

And if that isn't enough for you, there's always the cool factor. What stunning young lady could resist a man with a stick of fatwood in his tin?
 

Wave Man

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I have gotten into the habit of adding several heart wood fatwood sticks to all my kits, I have found the shavings loose their potency after a while if not stored in an air tight zip loc bag.
 

Wave Man

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I harvested these fatwood logs from a free standing dead pine branch on Saturday. It is some of the most saturated fatwood I have seen. Resin can be seen oozing from the heart wood.

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Wave Man

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My mate has a whole stump of fatwood curing at the moment, I reckon it will yield at least 20-30kg of top grade fatwood.
From what I saw on Saturday fatwood can be harvested from the following , (one point, resin saturated fatwood like this doesn't seem to rot[turning into punk wood] or is it vulnerable to termites),

free standing (dead) branches on pine trees. The branch is broken or damaged and the resin saturates what is left.
the usual stump left over after a pine tree has been felled, usually take a while (months, years) to cure . This produces the best fatwood of all.
the knots were branches break off the tree, a small amount of fatwood seems to form at the knot .
in harvested stumps of pines, often you will find a small amount of fatwood in the heart wood of these stumps.

Maya dust is just wood shavings of fatwood, and this stuff will take a spark from a ferro rod. It is some of the best tinders available. After processing fatwood collect the dust/shavings and store in an air tight bag. This product will loose potency if left unsealed.

My mate (who has the pine tree's growing on his acreage) did an experiment a little while ago, putting a fatwood root stump on a fire at night. In the morning the stump was still smoldering and allowed a fire to be resurrected easily and quickly. This is the advantage of fatwood.
 

GTVi

John McDouall Stuart
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I found this thread very educational Dean ! Learned a few new things today.
 

Bartnmax

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My mate just sent me a heap of fatwood(resinous pine wood)that he harvested off his property, apparently he has more of this wood then he knows what to do with.

Tell him to market the stuff as Aussie fatwood.
Judging by the reception here I'd say there['s a good opportunity waiting for him to cash in on.
It's also a great way of doing something with the offcuts that are no good for commerial use.

Bill.
 

Wave Man

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Tell him to market the stuff as Aussie fatwood.
Judging by the reception here I'd say there['s a good opportunity waiting for him to cash in on.
It's also a great way of doing something with the offcuts that are no good for commerial use.

Bill.
this is a thought mate, tho as you know most BC'ers love to do, harvest, collect etc every thing themselves. I reckon there is a small market for Aussie fatwood, for those that have no access to pine tree's. Coming up with a reasonable price is one of the hurdles I am facing as well.
 

AussiePreppers

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I was out Inglewood way on the weekend at a friend's property. It's covered in white cypress pine. I must have tried cutting into 20-30 stumps with an axe at first and a chainsaw later to try and find some fatwood. Nothing. I tried around 15 trees that had fallen, cutting them at various points near knots and other broken bits to try and find fatwood. Nothing. Only ever found some slighty darker more smelly wood but it definitely wasn't proper fatwood. I even ripped out a few large stumps and cut this way and that all through the roots and stump looking for it. Nothing. These trees were probably in poor health though, as most of the live cypress trees on this property only had their top branches left and all the standing dead had lost all their branches completely. All the fallen trees had no more branches left on them by the time I got to them. My next step will be to find either a standing or fallen dead tree from somewhere else in that area that has all its branches. All the trees I tried may have been too old or in poor health. If that fails, I think it might be safe to assume that white cypress pine in that area does not produce much fatwood.

Has anyone had any luck with white cypress and fatwood? While I don't mind other pines for fatwood I absolutely love the smell of white cypress on the fire.
 

Bartnmax

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Yeah there are many species of pines & cyprus pines are but one.
The tree most usually associated with fatwood (due to the impact of the Teev) is the American Longleaf Pine, although potentially all pines can produce fatwood. However, nt all pines will produce fatwood, no matter the species.
Some of the factors that govern it are, age/health of the tree, soil acidity, time of year (resin tends to be produced in greater amounts during peak growth times), & even localised atmospheric conditions (tempratures effect the amount of terpene the tree produces from basic carbon dioxide consumption - terpene being the base constituant of the resin).
So, it's quite possible to have a situation where a particular tree may produce prodigious amounts of fatwood yet anoither that is close by may produce none at all. It's all really a bit hit & miss. The factors have to be right for production of fatwood.

Bill.
 

Hairyman

Ludwig Leichhardt
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Procured a small supply of fatwood recently form the lower branches of a long dead but upright pine tree.
Tried some in the fire in the backyard..... no wonder your enthusiastic about it Dean!
It really goes up and the shavings take a spark from a fero rod very well.
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Wave Man

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fatwood is brilliant, and you have some nice pieces there mate. One thing, process it up and then wrap it in cling wrap, if you don't do this fatwood seems to lose potency after a while. That heart wood fatwood looks saturated.
 

AussiePreppers

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Nice one Hairy! I have a heap of 'sticks' for fire kits that i've dipped in wax a few times. If you have bigger pieces you can do what Wave Man recommends - cling wrap. I only process up a few pieces at a time and leave the main pieces of wood wrapped up in plastic bags to try and preserve the potency.

I had some at my folks place tucked away and my old man found it and thought it was normal pine and threw a heap of it in the fire to get it started... they thought it was going to blow the fireplace up! ;)
 

Templar

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Another tip for longer term storage is keep it in a milo tin, the press fit lid type... keeps if from degrading too...
 

Wave Man

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a mate just restocked me with fatwood and maya dust, a very nice haul. This will be the last from his current place, he has to move.
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Hairyman

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Another place to keep an eye out for fatwood is old pine pallets.
I scored this bit recently from a pine packing crate.
 

Mickldo

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I get a lot of mine from work too. The winches we fit to trucks at work come with pine packing around them that have a lot of fatwood content. I have quite a fair sized stash next to my tool box.
 

rush006

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Great thread, been looking everywhere but still have not found any. will look harder.
 

rush006

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I went out today and found quite a lot. It seems that the really sticky wet looking parts will take a spark and the rest wont. what does take a spark burns like a hexi tablet. the oldest stump sample seems to be the best.
 
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