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Bloffy13

Jon Muir
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I have heard of this amazing site before. I believe they had elaborate trade lines as far as the Kimberley. Not only that, but they were also downstream processing the eels, creating leather items etc. A community of 10,000 people, complete with a wide range of trades is an amazing achievement in any prehistoric community. This appears to have been an amazing and significant location. There should be no hesitation in classifying it as a world heritage area in my opinion.
Cheers
Bloffy
 

Hairyman

Ludwig Leichhardt
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"International scientists have uncovered prehistoric human DNA of two extinct human relatives - the Neanderthals, and the Denisovans- from caves without bones, an advance that could shed new light on human history and evolution. "
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/2017/04/28/prehistoric-human-dna-found-caves-without-bones-enormous-scientific/

Possible signs of humans in the Americas 130,000 years ago ??
http://westerndigs.org/mastodon-site-in-san-diego-said-to-be-earliest-sign-of-humans-in-america-riling-skeptics/
 

Blake

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Wow that second link is a massive find if the dates are verified to be accurate!
 

Hairyman

Ludwig Leichhardt
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Plos one article without journalistic embellishment :)
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0177127
Abstract

The split of our own clade from the Panini is undocumented in the fossil record. To fill this gap we investigated the dentognathic morphology of Graecopithecus freybergi from Pyrgos Vassilissis (Greece) and cf. Graecopithecus sp. from Azmaka (Bulgaria), using new μCT and 3D reconstructions of the two known specimens. Pyrgos Vassilissis and Azmaka are currently dated to the early Messinian at 7.175 Ma and 7.24 Ma. Mainly based on its external preservation and the previously vague dating, Graecopithecus is often referred to as nomen dubium. The examination of its previously unknown dental root and pulp canal morphology confirms the taxonomic distinction from the significantly older northern Greek hominine Ouranopithecus. Furthermore, it shows features that point to a possible phylogenetic affinity with hominins. G. freybergi uniquely shares p4 partial root fusion and a possible canine root reduction with this tribe and therefore, provides intriguing evidence of what could be the oldest known hominin.
 

Aussie123

Never Alone In The Bush
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Plos one article without journalistic embellishment :)
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0177127
Abstract

The split of our own clade from the Panini is undocumented in the fossil record. To fill this gap we investigated the dentognathic morphology of Graecopithecus freybergi from Pyrgos Vassilissis (Greece) and cf. Graecopithecus sp. from Azmaka (Bulgaria), using new μCT and 3D reconstructions of the two known specimens. Pyrgos Vassilissis and Azmaka are currently dated to the early Messinian at 7.175 Ma and 7.24 Ma. Mainly based on its external preservation and the previously vague dating, Graecopithecus is often referred to as nomen dubium. The examination of its previously unknown dental root and pulp canal morphology confirms the taxonomic distinction from the significantly older northern Greek hominine Ouranopithecus. Furthermore, it shows features that point to a possible phylogenetic affinity with hominins. G. freybergi uniquely shares p4 partial root fusion and a possible canine root reduction with this tribe and therefore, provides intriguing evidence of what could be the oldest known hominin.
Amazing ! There have been suggestions of non-african origins, but may be the start evidence !
 

Hairyman

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Hairyman

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Hairyman

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"Reimagining the History of Human Migration With a 65,000-Year-Old Find"
That headline is great improvement on the "History has to be rewritten" one used far too
often in the popular press.

"They were typical humans. They hunted and gathered. They ground nuts, plants, and seeds, and built hearths. They also worked the oldest-known ground-edge axes and used the oldest-known reflective pigment. They lived, surprisingly, 65,000 years ago in Australia, which pushes back the earliest-known settlement of Down Under by 15,000 years."


https://www.hakaimagazine.com/article-short/reimagining-history-human-migration-65000-year-old-find
 

Thrud

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I saw that, but I wasn't sure if they were going to dig deeper!
 

Bloffy13

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Awesome stuff. The Elder they spoke to on ABC sounded like he welcomed the find and was appreciative of the research being done.
If there was such a rich layer of artifacts found, I wonder if they go deeper, will they find further, older finds? From what I understand, this was a veritable treasure trove. That doesn't happen overnight. There's got to be more, methinks.
Anyone willing to put money against 70,000 years? Given the recent spate of finds across the northern region, I think it is only a matter of time....
Cheers
Bloffy
 
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