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Hairyman

Ludwig Leichhardt
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Artefacts of animal bone and charcoal recently found at the Ganga Maya cave site in the WA's Pilbara region and analysed through carbon-dating techniques
indicate use of the cave may date from more than 45,000 years ago.
These early dates make the site a contender for one of a few of the earliest known for people in Australia.
There are more caves in the area yet to be explored by archaeologists.


Read more here; http://www.smh.com.au/national/archaeological-cave-dig-unearths-artefacts-from-45000-years-ago-20140614-zs7wd.html
 
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http://www.abc.net.au/science/articles/2014/09/22/4080301.htm?topic=ancient
"Analysis of ancient human bones supports the idea that the first inhabitants of Vanuatu developed horticulture as they ran out of wild resources."

... and in Europe, ..."Stone tools found in Austria, dated to about 43,500 years ago, are suggested to have been made by anatomically modern humans who coexisted with Neanderthals in Europe."
http://popular-archaeology.com/issue/fall-09012014/article/study-shows-early-modern-human-settlement-in-central-europe-over-43-000-years-ago
 

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From an article published in Archaeology magazine, Friday, December 05, 2014
"UNIVERSITY PARK, PENNSYLVANIA—The genomes of five Khoisan study participants living in different tribes in Namibia were compared with the genomes of 1,462 people from 48 ethnic groups from around the world. The analysis suggests that the Khoisan population may have comprised the majority of living humans during most of the past 150,000 years, while remaining physically isolated and genetically distinct from Europeans, Asians, and all other Africans. “Khoisan hunter-gatherers in Southern Africa always have perceived themselves as the oldest people,” ".
... and, “This and previous studies show that the Khoisan peoples and the rest of modern humanity shared their most recent common ancestor approximately 150,000 years ago, so it was entirely unexpected to find that this group apparently did not intermarry with non-Khoisan neighbors for many thousand years,”
http://archaeology.org/news/2759-141205-khoisan-genome-population
 

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Link to a 2012 article in New Dawn magazine titled "The First Race: Out-of-Australia, Not Africa!"
http://www.newdawnmagazine.com/articles/the-first-race-out-of-australia-not-africa
"New Dawn .... presents alternative news and views on global trends and world affairs, tackling issues and subjects the mainstream media often refuses to touch."
Definitely not the mainstream view of where and how modern humans arose but raises some interesting points.
 

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Aussie123

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"Unearthed grave sheds light on Batavia shipwreck mass murder"
http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-02-03/unearthed-grave-sheds-light-on-batavia-shipwreck-mass-murder/6068008
"A new grave has been discovered almost four centuries after the Batavia was wrecked on Morning Reef, within the Abrolhos Islands."
""This was the first time that Europeans lived in Australia — albeit it wasn't in the mainland but it was here — so it's the oldest known European habitation in Australia," "
Thanks.

The whole Batavia story is quite Bizarre, well worth a read.
 

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Aussie123

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Thanks. Both fascinating reads.

I love the ancient stories, and I'm a firm believer that "many" (some) traditional stories from all around the world are based on actual events. Its fascinating when science can seem to show this may be the case. It certainly shows how powerful oral traditions can be.

Tim's article is certainly thought provoking.
It many ways this is a secret part of European history, but acknowledging it would require a big re-think about the relationship between the Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal community. Its been 200 years, guess its not likely any time soon ...
 
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