anyone interested in boomerangs, clubs, spears ect.

julius

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Im wondering if anyone is interested in Aboriginal clubs spears and boomerangs here? Ive got a large collection of them and made many my self.. but ive never met another person here with an interest in it.

Ive used a woomera to throw a spear and kill wallabys when spotlighting when i was a kid and also used a woomera to throw fishing spears and it works very well.
with a bamboo spear you can even through well over 100 meters. real good fun,
ive never seen anyone use a woomera here apart from the Aboriginal people up in the top end.. in darwin as a kid id go to the football oval and throw spears there with a woomera and people thought it was very strange to see or complain and call the police.. ha..
boomerangs there are not a thing there at all, i think they are unknown in the topend until almost to katherine so it was mostly spears .. nulla nullas.. my first boomerang was form the 2nd hand-shop looked to be from the kimberly region.. some hard dark acacia wood , i think the first boomerangs youll ever find up there is around mataranka.. further north just spears..

that was a few decades go .. and back then youd still probably get a good quality woomera from the native if you asked about, dont know about know
down here i get most of the tribal stuff in flea markets.. woomeras and proper spears are rare. boomerangs are the most common, ill try to copy the item i find if its interesting.. hardest thing is getting the right wood down here.., especially for boomerangs.
anyway ive always enjoyed this stoneage stuff. but never seen anyone else interested in it..
 
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Edward

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In the early 80's I started a collection of spears, woomeras, nulla nullas, stones and boomerangs, more as artefacts as opposed to using them. I did throw the boomerang a few times as a kid in 1981.

In 1990, a friend of mine saw a an old black man throw a boomerang at a young black man in Daly Waters from the other side of an oval. It sliced his leg open like a busted water-melon. I think they can be effective weapons, but in the right hands. That said they are still very primitive weapons, IMO, I couldn't get the knack of.
 

Le Loup

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im wondering if anyone is interested in aboriginal clubs spears and boomerangs here? ive got a large collection of them and made many my self.. but ive never met another person here with an interest in it.
ive used a woomera to throw a spear and kill wallabys when spotlighting when i was a kid and also used a woomera to throw fishing spears and it works very well.
with a bamboo spear you can even through well over 100 meters. real good fun,
ive never seen anyone use a woomera here apart from the abos up in the top end.. in darwin as a kid id go to the football oval and throw spears there with a woomera and people thought it was very strange to see or complain and call the police.. ha..
boomerangs there are not a thing there at all, i think they are unknown in the topend until almost to katherine so it was mostly spears .. nulla nullas.. my first boomerang was form the 2nd hand-shop looked to be from the kimberly region.. some hard dark acacia wood , i think the first boomerangs youll ever find up there is around mataranka.. further north just spears..

that was a few decades go .. and back then youd still probably get a good quality woomera from the native if you asked about, dont know about know
down here i get most of the tribal stuff in flea markets.. woomeras and proper spears are rare. boomerangs are the most common, ill try to copy the item i find if its interesting.. hardest thing is getting the right wood down here.., especially for boomerangs.
anyway ive always enjoyed this stoneage stuff. but never seen anyone else interested in it..
Usage note. Since abo is simply a shortened form of aborigine, one could easily think that it is as neutral and inoffensive a term as Aussie usually is for an Australian. However, abo is as highly offensive to Australian Aborigines as nigger is to African Americans in the United States.
Keith.
 

koalaboi

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I had written a similar response to Le Loup's above regarding the use of "abo" as a term to describe Aboriginal people but wiped it not wanting to preach. I spend a lot of time with Aboriginal men and I can tell you they find that term really, really insulting. Back in the day, dehumanising Aboriginal people was a way that a dominant culture could rationalise its treatment of Aboriginal peoples: massacres, removal of children and denial of basic human rights and citizenship etc.

Refer to Aboriginal people or peoples as simply that. Terms like koori, murri, noongar, yolgnu are OK as long as you are using them correctly eg you would not refer to an Aboriginal feller from Qld as a koori etc. In some situations, using terms like blackfellers can be OK but that depends on the context and your relationship with the people you are talking to.

This "first nations" term, that seems to be coming into vogue atm, is another problem that my elders have serious issues with. It is to them, an appropriation of an American term for its first peoples who actually were nations but is not actually appropriate for Australia.

If we have "first nations" in Australia, then we would need to have a treaty with each one and, from what I've been taught, there was one lore across the country, albeit in slightly different forms.

BTW: Aboriginal should be spelled with a capital A.

KB
 
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Edward

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Usage note. Since abo is simply a shortened form of aborigine, one could easily think that it is as neutral and inoffensive a term as Aussie usually is for an Australian. However, abo is as highly offensive to Australian Aborigines as nigger is to African Americans in the United States.
Keith.

I don't think we need to jump on the guy for trying to explain something. He wasn't directing it to anyone in particular, just trying to get a point across. Some of us Australian's are tired of the political Nannying and fear mongering. I might add, Keith, the word 'Aborigine' you used is also supposed to be taboo, in fact for the last 20 + years since Mabo II.
 

koalaboi

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What political nannying? What fear mongering?

Didn't see any here.

KB
 

Rubbing Elbows

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Have you seen the modern day version Boomerang. This American has mastered the engineering of the modern day throwing stick. It's a shame an Australian didn't go to the effort this guy did to bring the boomerang to the 21st century.

I really do like boomerangs, but most you see for sale in shops today, are just cheap tourist ornaments made for show and not the real thing. At least you can seriously use the throwing sticks this guy sells.



 

Blake

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Happy for this thread to continue for now but I would ask that the word 'abo' is not ever used on the forum and ask that members use Aboriginal Australians, Indigenous Australians, or Aboriginal people.

I don't think that julius intended any offence and I don't think that Kieth's response was over the top. It is a word that is offensive certainly to the majority of Aboriginal Australians. It is offensive because it has been use pejoratively in the past just like many other words that we don't use anymore.

koalaboi's post earlier in the thread also articulates this well. Thanks guys. Appreciate everyones understanding on this one.
 
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sami12

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I am very interested in a proper boomerang. I had a neighbour that made them back when i was a kid. they would fly around the oval over the road from our house and sometimes come back much too far (depending how hard you threw them)
 

Thrud

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I'd like to make a Kylie, Ive seen videos of people making them, but can't find dimensions. I would want an 80-100m range, but if anyone has any plans for a throwing stick or can post me in the right direction I'd appreciate it.
 

Irishscott.

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So what is a boomerang that doesn't come back?
Cheers
Bloffy
hello Bloffy, that's an old joke,
but I think if its OK for me to comment on behalf of Australia's more original caretakers, I have read that boomerangs that returned are really a toy or possibly a herding tool, and that what's sometimes called a "karlie" is a stick that looked a lot like a boomerang, only often straighter, and with the appearance of a tick like your school teacher may have done on correct answers, is carved with the design of a strait flat trajectory, which the early English settlers described as having the appearance from the distance of a large scimitar. having the lift of birds wings, four feet long, 3 to 4 inches wide and an inch thick. It could out range the English longbow, especially when thrown from a vantage point or into the wind. and would break a kangaroo's neck 400 yards away.

Also it has been pointed out that indigenous Australians were not the owner of the invention but rather the last to be still using them. That said however I believe they were a lot more sophisticated than we give them credit for. Having many more tools and utilization of the natural resources especially medicinal herbs, and their pharmaceutical benefits and methodology than our doctors would like us to know about.
 

Bloffy13

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No disrespect meant. It was a joke. Yes, the Kylie or karlie etc was a formidable weapon/tool. I believe it had other names as well, but not sure what it was called.
My next door neighbour is a retired policeman who worked for several years in the North West and has an amazing collection given to him by Elders etc in appreciation for his services. He can tell me the story behind each one and he is very proud of them. One is so big you would probably need two hands to throw it, I think.
Most impressive.
Cheers
Bloffy
 
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