Anthropogenic Global Warming & the Garden!

Le Loup

Rüdiger Nehberg
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Last year was pretty much a disaster, & this year has started in the same vein. The leaves of vegies burning in the sun, losing much of our fruit due to a warm winter, then the drought & running low on water & then the threat of bushfires. So, we have been making changes in the garden. We know that anthropogenic global warming is going to get worse, so we are preparing for the present & hopefully the future. Our grandchildren may not survive global warming, but hopefully we can help them survive teotwawki.

One of our galvo water tanks up at the cottage was leaking, so I cut it into three sections & made three raised garden beds. Whilst cleaning up the cottage garden area one of my sons decided to get rid of the old water tanks being used to store firewood, so that has produced another three raised garden beds. A small tank that I was thinking of repairing also got converted into two more smaller raised garden beds because we decided to install two more new 1000 gallon water tanks for the garden. We used to pump water from the big dam for the gardens at the cottage & the main house, but for the first time in 30 odd years, this dam became almost dry. We decided to preserve what was left for the local wildlife & for fire fighting if needs be. Fortunately though the fires were all around us & we were enveloped in heavy smoke for weeks, the fires never reached our forest.
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Five tank raised garden beds & the sand pit for our grandchildren.
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The first raised garden bed I made from old roofing iron & four posts.
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My second design for a raised garden bed using pallets cut in half & old roofing iron.
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The latest raised garden bed additions, smaller but still useful. The advantages of these raised garden beds is that I think they will retain moisture better, they are easier to shade, easier to weed if needed, the bed is better secured & can not spread onto the paths, & it keeps the ducks out!!!
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Well it's a bird bath right? And I am a bird right?
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One new water tank on the left installed, we are still waiting on the second one to arrive. Since the drought everyone has been ordering more water tanks.
Keith.
 

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Kindliing

Les Stroud
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You have been busy there, good to see you feeling fit.
A sensible height for gardening i think too all things considered, including pests.

I saw Antarctica got to 18 deg, Celsius today on the news.

I think everyone's in the same boat with the environmental changes .
Up here in the north I've been speaking with people who say "syn-tropic" farming is the future.

From the little bit of been told ,
They're basically creating their own forest layers that cycle existence back into itself like nature would,

They have fast growing gums that get cut to provide shade and mulch, also I'm told they draw moisture up from deeper down.
Bananas , mangos etc spaced between, and ground crops beneath.

I know when the ground outside is brown under their trees stays greener longer.
The idea came from Brazil I think.

It keeps their place a bit cooler also.

I'm sure there's some kind of sensible farming that can tolerate drought better to some degree down there too Keith.

Speaking of teotwawki, shouldn't be long now lol. (No kidding).
The way things are going. I'll be going the nomadic hunter fisherman gatherer route myself.
 

Le Loup

Rüdiger Nehberg
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Good to hear from you kindling, & thanks for commenting. Appreciated.
We are looking into ember catching trees planted with succulents underneath.
Heat wise, it feels like I am back in the Territory again, so hot & humid here.
Regards, Keith.
 

Aussie123

Never Alone In The Bush
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Amazing to see so much work going into your garden.
The raised beds can also be good because you don't need to bend down to see what's happening.

We planted lots of things in our (small) garden this year and its been a bit mixed.
We've had 3 zucchinis total from about 6 plants.
On the other hand we had a really good crop of apricots ... hard to know if its just us ...
 

Le Loup

Rüdiger Nehberg
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Amazing to see so much work going into your garden.
The raised beds can also be good because you don't need to bend down to see what's happening.

We planted lots of things in our (small) garden this year and its been a bit mixed.
We've had 3 zucchinis total from about 6 plants.
On the other hand we had a really good crop of apricots ... hard to know if its just us ...
We have had some rain Aussie, but before that our forest trees were dying. Many have not recovered, & the trees have not flowered. There are no bees here now so I have to pollinate the zucchinis by hand. We had natural bee hives in the forest, but no sign of them now.
Keith.
 

Hairyman

Ludwig Leichhardt
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Meanwhile in SEQld, I saw vine scrub trees dying through lack of water and the only
reason it didn't burn was a lack of ignition.
I had trouble keeping vegies alive let alone productive despite watering every day. Most plants
leaves just cooked in the sun. The only survivors were a couple of pumpkins and they barely made it.
Once we had consistent rain their growth exploded out but they have produced only a few pumpkins.
I do notice a lot of purslane everywhere.
 

Le Loup

Rüdiger Nehberg
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Meanwhile in SEQld, I saw vine scrub trees dying through lack of water and the only
reason it didn't burn was a lack of ignition.
I had trouble keeping vegies alive let alone productive despite watering every day. Most plants
leaves just cooked in the sun. The only survivors were a couple of pumpkins and they barely made it.
Once we had consistent rain their growth exploded out but they have produced only a few pumpkins.
I do notice a lot of purslane everywhere.
Interesting about the purslane, since the drought, & since these latest rains, we have got more weeds coming up that we have never seen before than you can shake a stick at !!! Weird.
Keith.
 

Kindliing

Les Stroud
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Re : Purslane ,
One use mentioned for purslane in the book ' Weed Foragers Handbook'
Is as a freshly crushed poultice, as it is present in the hotter months. Putting on "hot and itchy skin conditions"!.

Sounds to be useful stuff , anti inflammatory , an analgesic , and a wound healer , great for bumps cuts scrapes as a topical application.
 
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