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Another croc attack

Kindlling

Les Hiddins
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Met this guy a couple years ago at a ww2 radar site tour .

he was telling me how he liked to go bush hunting and fishing and we chatted about plants .

lucky he had army boots on and his military hunting knife 😅 good job remembering to take a big breath before he was dragged under .

if you've ever seen a croc that big they get huge when they fill out at that size , thats a huge animal , they told him no one has ever come back up .

the humans have been fighting their way out of the crocodiles jaws well this last year .
 
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Le Loup

Rüdiger Nehberg
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Met this guy a couple years ago at a ww2 radar site tour .

he was telling me how he liked to go bush hunting and fishing and we chatted about plants .

lucky he had army boots on and his military hunting knife 😅 good job remembering to take a big breath before he was dragged under .

if you've ever seen a croc that big they get huge when they fill out at that size , thats a huge animal , they told him no one has ever come back up .

the humans have been fighting their way out of the crocodiles jaws well this last year .
I lived in the Territory for 10 years, I survived cyclone Tracey in 74. When you live there if you have any sense at all you are very careful about going anywhere near water. I used to go fishing & hunting at "The Gap". A croc took my fish one time, I was using a heavy line wrapped around my steel folding chair. The croc dragged my chair through the sand for maybe a meter before the line broke. I always carried a holstered revolver back then.
Crocs don't always come from the water, sometimes that are already higher up on the bank & will take you on the way down. You never get close enough to the water for a croc to grab you, & when filling the billy you always use a rope attached.
Keith.
 

Randall

Richard Proenneke
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That's a pretty full on knife to be carrying :D. It makes me wonder if carrying that added to his bravado? I can't think of many reasons to carry a knife like that.

I can understand his complacency. There are some beautiful sandy swimming holes on the fitzroy river (the one in NW WA). Every few years someone gets taken from one of them - or they used to. I never liked swimming in murky water - my imagination keeps me safe :D
 
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Kindlling

Les Hiddins
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About that knife size Randall ,

To quote crocodile dundee

“Yeah well ..... barramundi is a bloody big fish !“ 😁
 
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Kindlling

Les Hiddins
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Yes i carry 6.5 inch blade for this reason too in the bush , you never know when you will need it so its best to be prepared . Btw have been bailed up by a pig before caught unawares , we crossed each others paths and she had piglets .
 

Edward

Ray Mears
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I lived in the Territory for 10 years, I survived cyclone Tracey in 74. When you live there if you have any sense at all you are very careful about going anywhere near water. I used to go fishing & hunting at "The Gap". A croc took my fish one time, I was using a heavy line wrapped around my steel folding chair. The croc dragged my chair through the sand for maybe a meter before the line broke. I always carried a holstered revolver back then.
Crocs don't always come from the water, sometimes that are already higher up on the bank & will take you on the way down. You never get close enough to the water for a croc to grab you, & when filling the billy you always use a rope attached.
Keith.


Ah...you were there during the best of times... I met people there from those days. I lived in Darwin for 9 years and the Territory 12 years. I got there in 99' just after they tore the old Don Hotel down. I took some chances, thats for sure. But they didn't call me "Eddy the Bushman" at school for nothing. I earned it. I swam in the river mouth of a small creek not far from Casuarina Beach and Buffalo Creek once - the water was crystal clear though. I also used to swim in a waterhole near Dundee Beacj, the old timers told me was safe and when it was safe. With no one around and my X-Yugoslav Army 7.92mm Mauser 48A Rifle in the car sometimes I would get a bad feeling and just had to get out. I also attempted to spear Baramundi one night in knee deep water in the Adelaide River at night using a spotlight while on a fishing trip, that was very pretty stupid I admit. I could see the crocs red eyes on the other side of the river looking at me! In my University undergrauduate years I use to run on Casuarina Beach before the sun came up at dawn. That was a little un-nerving to be honest, even then. Comming accross a 1 tone Crocadile on the beach in the dark while out of breath, wouldn't of been that fun! I wasn't a worrier. But the old timers had a saying for putting worriers to rest prior to embarking on an adventure near water, I agreed with, "if he gets you, he gets you!".

But thats not the worst of it. In the early 90's I swam in the Stradbroke Island channel for 45mins! My mother said I was lucky to be alive, as have others. The local shop owner came down and begged me to get out of the water. And the tour boat operator who took us there was just watching me from the pulpit-bow hoping I'd get taken, which I didn't know until later. He told me that when I asked him why he didn't let me know there were sharks there, lots of sharks! I honestly didn't know what all the fuss was about until later. Unbeknownst to me at the time apparently it was bullshark, hammerhead and tiger shark infested. But I ignored her, after all, I was on holidays and I was young! I later came to regret not listening to her. She was just trying to save my life! I will say this however, I don't know if I sensed this or not, but as I was diving down under the water it didn't feel right. I mean the water somehow felt different. It was like being in a mild washing machine. It was odd. The temperature of the water also seems to be changing and I would describe it as patchy. It could have been the current, but I'm not convinced as it was localised and the water was in general, very calm. Visibility beneath the water was very poor though, perhaps 1-1.5m in front of me. I am only semising here and maybe it was just the current (and) the 'Jaws anxiety' we all occasionally get to some extent in the ocean, but this could have been the wakes and body heat created by schools of circlying sharks, just meters from me. The balance of probablilites proves I would not have lasted much longer at all. As the years have past many have said even 45mins was a mild miracle and that the sharks probably thought I was crazy, so they were being overly cautious. I only came out twice and very briefly before returning to the water again immediately, like to have a drink of water and chat to a mate for a few seconds, who couldn't swim. Oh, the glory of being a young and brave outdoorsman! "If he gets you he gets you", I guess!
 
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Edward

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Yes i carry 6.5 inch blade for this reason too in the bush , you never know when you will need it so its best to be prepared . Btw have been bailed up by a pig before caught unawares , we crossed each others paths and she had piglets .
Gee Kindlling, that is somthing I've always dreaded. You were lucky to walk away from that one unscathed. @barefoot dave is right.

I must say though I use to think of wild pigs as somthing of a 'monster', but they're not. I saw a few videos of wild pig hunts, and the pigs just seem to be trying to get away. Even when they acted in self defense they didn't seem 'that' maliceful, knocking one hunter over and running off, lol... I do know they are very smart and very dangerous of course, but you have to hand it to them!

This is one of the best videos I've seen on You Tube. Loved it!

 

Kindlling

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The boars do sound like horror movie monsters when they are all pumped up with testosterone fighting each other , I have sat watching them while camping before .
As soon as they got a whiff of the dog and I they took off immediately.

A lot if not most of the attacks fall into the “play stupid games , win stupid prizes” category .

One guy on a Uhunt vid got his leg opened right up , the dogs had a boar bailed and he grabbed the wrong end , that and one in new zealand where a guy was drunk I think and the guys he was with told him to grab the pig by the ears , again he got ripped on the leg , luckily it was not the femoral artery .

In my case we just stumbled on each other as they would pass through eating fruit from the orchid on the edge of the rainforest . Unlike the first guy in the vid you posted my dog stepped between me and the pig , and did not chase it towards me 😁

I see them fairly often most of the time they take their time moseying away .
I think you can get yourself into a situation by circumstances sometimes , like if you have a dog and the dog stops it by barking , or different things I have heard , like pigs being protective , even the boars in some cases .

They know they are formidable , and a force to be reckoned with .
I don’t claim to be an animal psychologist , i think if you think you have them figured out your on your way to trouble.

Saying that ,don’t think they are out hunting the humans .

If they learn to co inhabitate places and lose fear like in other countries its a different story too .
They seem to want to get away.
 
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barefoot dave

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Kindlling, I agree with your assessment. I don't go out Bush fearful if anything, humans included. But I am wary, respectful of their ability to wound/ kill. I spent a few years sneaking around FNQ (rainforest and Savanna), mostly at night and never died once! ;) Had a few closer calls to but, as you say, we all just wanted to keep clear of each other. Pretty much all 'random' attacks aren't from aggressiveness, just cornering, response to dogs or you got between them and their young.
On patrol, I was more ruined for the sound of piglets or cassowary chicks that anything else. Humans were pretty easy to be aware of a safe distance away.
 

Jred

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Wow, both lucky and unlucky. Glad he survived.
 

beast

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Animals of the North can be dangerous however they are only unpredictable to the curious foolhardy or those unfortunate enough to put them selves between the animal and its perceived salvation.
Buffalo are typically gentle animals however are very protective and have a high fight or flight drive, they will very much commit to either. Scrub bulls are very similar but can harbour a contempt for humans and dogs.
Wild dogs will actively hunt people but a mostly undetected doing this until they attack. You would need to appear very vulnerable for Wild dogs to attempt and attack.
Pig's also commit to the fight or flight when cornered. Pig's will only charge if the perceive no other option. A sow may charge to protect her young but will still rather evade. With regards to young a buffalo will attack to protect young even if the young is not there's and will charge if they her or see calves in distress.

Crocs and sharks... well human are an easy meal. A good rule of thumb with crocs is they can launch the full length of their body out of water and can pull down and kill cattle. Just bare that in mind around waters of the North and you'll be OK. Another thing if there are barramundi in the water there is also crocs
 

Le Loup

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Animals of the North can be dangerous however they are only unpredictable to the curious foolhardy or those unfortunate enough to put them selves between the animal and its perceived salvation.
Buffalo are typically gentle animals however are very protective and have a high fight or flight drive, they will very much commit to either. Scrub bulls are very similar but can harbour a contempt for humans and dogs.
Wild dogs will actively hunt people but a mostly undetected doing this until they attack. You would need to appear very vulnerable for Wild dogs to attempt and attack.
Pig's also commit to the fight or flight when cornered. Pig's will only charge if the perceive no other option. A sow may charge to protect her young but will still rather evade. With regards to young a buffalo will attack to protect young even if the young is not there's and will charge if they her or see calves in distress.

Crocs and sharks... well human are an easy meal. A good rule of thumb with crocs is they can launch the full length of their body out of water and can pull down and kill cattle. Just bare that in mind around waters of the North and you'll be OK. Another thing if there are barramundi in the water there is also crocs
Good post beast, excellent & factual. I will add that during the wet season crocs will travel long distances from water hole to water hole, no water can be assumed to be safe!
Regards, Keith.
 

old4570

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I remember when this movie came out ..
People were screaming BS ..
Only thing was , a hunter in QLD shot a 800+ pounder at the same time the movie was being shot !
 
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