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Advantages of Using/Carrying 18th Century Equipment.

Le Loup

Rüdiger Nehberg
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Crusoe Sepia 004.jpg

The Advantages of Carrying/Using 18th Century Equipment.
• A flintlock smoothbore gun is versatile, you can make fire with the lock without using any gunpowder, you can use various sizes of small shot & round ball, you can if necessary use other projectiles besides lead, you can retrieve lead from shot game & remould it for further use. If the lock should malfunction it is easily repaired with spare springs, if you have no spare springs the lock is easily converted to matchlock.
• A flintlock rifle has the same advantages as the smoothbore except that it can not use small shot without leading the barrel. A .32 flintlock rifle has more power than a .22 rimfire & is less expensive to shoot.
• You can purchase an antique flintlock pistol now with no need for licence or registration.
• Ball moulds can be used as heavy tweezers for removing foreign objects from the body.
• Gunpowder (Black Powder) can be used to make fire with unprepared plant tinders without wasting ammunition.
• A trade axe/tomahawk is very versatile. The head is easily removed to be used as a hide scraper, the tomahawk can be thrown for recreation, self defence & hunting. This axe is a good defence weapon for hand to hand fighting, for constructing shelters & traps & for hammering in stakes or wooden pegs. A new helve/handle is easy to make & fit & does not require a wedge to secure the head.
• The awl is used for making leather items & for repairing leather items. The awl is used to make & repair moccasins.
• The butcher knife is for skinning & butchering game & can be used for self-defence.
• The legging knife is a back-up to the butcher knife. If you should dull the edge on your butcher knife you can continue with the legging knife. You do not want to stay around sharpening blades. Your shot may have attracted unwanted attention.
• The clasp knife is used for camp chores & for making trap triggers. You do not want to use your main blades as utility knives.
• Flint, steel & tinderbox will enable you to make fire anywhere in all weathers. It will not break or wear out & the process is renewable & sustainable.
• 18th century woodsrunner’s clothing (men & women) is practicle, protective, hard wearing & renewable.
• The housewife (sewing kit) is for making & repairing clothing & packs. The needles can be used for removing splinters & if needs be sewing up wounds. The beeswax is used to wax the linen sewing thread & can be used as makeshift tooth fillings.
• The angling tackle can be used with a rod or set lines, it can also be used for catching ducks & large land fowl. The linen or silk lines can be replaces with hand made cordage made from plant materials. Silk lines can be used as suture thread.
• The cooking kettle is used for boiling food, boiling water for drinks & sterilising, carrying water & for catching rainwater.
• Cotton & linen bags can be used for cleaning dirty water before boiling for drinking or adding to your water bottle.
• Gun tools are used for repairing the lock on your flintlock muzzle-loading gun if needs be, but these locks are very hard wearing. The tools are merely a back-up. The turn screw is used to remove the lock & barrel for cleaning.
• The whet stone is used to sharpen your blades, as is the metal file though both could have other uses if working with metal.
• The half-axe is optional & is capable of heavier work than the tomahawk without adding too much weight.
• An auger is optional & is used for making holes for constructing more permanent dwellings. These augers come in a variety of sizes & weigh very little. Small versions will fit in your pack, where longer versions can be tied to your blanket roll.
• The sword is also optional but in a hand to hand fight can be very useful. The sword is also used for cutting reeds for shelter & mat construction.
• The wool blanket is far more versatile than a sleeping bag, & if wet the blanket retains more body heat than a sleeping bag. The pure wool blanket can be used as a matchcoat or a Great Coat & can be used in a sitting position under an oilcloth covering on the trail.
• The oilcloth shelter is very versatile & can be used in many ways, including use as a rain coat. Used as a lean-to shelter you can use fire for warmth at night & you have good visibility on at least three sides. The lean-to is easy & quick to construct & quickly taken down. It does not need tent poles/rods & it is easy to carry.

Anyone using this equipment is advised to learn the many primitive skills that go with this type of wilderness living. If you are living this 18th century lifestyle then your level of comfort will never drop below this level. This equipment does not wear out, anything that should break can be repaired or replaced from natural sources. You are also advised to carry a modern medical kit which should include an eye wash glass.
 

Bloffy13

Jon Muir
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I have a lot of respect for people who embrace the traditional ways.
Personally, I am one who likes my modern comforts but reading this list, I am tempted to give it a try. About the only things I don't have are the awl, the auger and the oilskin. I reckon the first two would be easy to add to the list. There's a great secondhand dealer in town that tends to have a lot of old tools etc. (I am still to see a decent vintage axe but such is life). I think the oilskin, I will have to research a bit more but could be an interesting addition to my kit.
Does anyone have a modern kit and a traditonal kit?
Cheers
Bloffy
 

Le Loup

Rüdiger Nehberg
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I have a lot of respect for people who embrace the traditional ways.
Personally, I am one who likes my modern comforts but reading this list, I am tempted to give it a try. About the only things I don't have are the awl, the auger and the oilskin. I reckon the first two would be easy to add to the list. There's a great secondhand dealer in town that tends to have a lot of old tools etc. (I am still to see a decent vintage axe but such is life). I think the oilskin, I will have to research a bit more but could be an interesting addition to my kit.
Does anyone have a modern kit and a traditonal kit?
Cheers
Bloffy

These tomahawks are made by blacksmiths here in Australia or they can be ordered from overseas. I think Pioneer Forge in Victoria are still making them: Phone 03 5729 5564 or email glen@pioneerforge.com.au

The one I carry now I converted from a standard modern hatchet head.

Half-axe V Tomahawk 001.jpg
Half-axe & tomahawk made by Glenn Mitchell of Pioneer Forge.
TOMAHAWK 2 001.jpg
The tomahawk I made from a modern hatchet head.

I used to use modern gear many years ago Bloffy, but became bored with that camping style. I find that using 18th century gear is fun as well as being far superior for survival purposes.
Regards, Keith.
 

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theslothman

Russell Coight
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Im a big fan of the "mountain man" kit. My Dad has been hunting with black powder exclusively for years. Its great fun to make up your own kit and even clothing and pouches etc out of personally hunted deer hide. Its definitely a very natural feel hunting in this fashion. Ive been out with a longbow with him with both of us carrying traditional kit. It was like Hawkeye and chingachgook with a bow. lol
I've got some old youtube vids (a channel i havnt used for a long while)shooting some of his stuff. I made them years ago and have put tasteless music to them though lol.

I do want to check though, are you sure its legal to own a functional black powder pistol of any kind without a license or rego in Australia? As far as im aware you still require a collectors license at least even if its made no longer functional.
 

Le Loup

Rüdiger Nehberg
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Im a big fan of the "mountain man" kit. My Dad has been hunting with black powder exclusively for years. Its great fun to make up your own kit and even clothing and pouches etc out of personally hunted deer hide. Its definitely a very natural feel hunting in this fashion. Ive been out with a longbow with him with both of us carrying traditional kit. It was like Hawkeye and chingachgook with a bow. lol
I've got some old youtube vids (a channel i havnt used for a long while)shooting some of his stuff. I made them years ago and have put tasteless music to them though lol.

I do want to check though, are you sure its legal to own a functional black powder pistol of any kind without a license or rego in Australia? As far as im aware you still require a collectors license at least even if its made no longer functional.

Hi theslothman. You would have to check for other states, but here in NSW you can own any antique gun/rifle/pistol for which breech-loading ammunition is no longer available over the counter, without licence, registration or permit to purchase. If you see an antique pistol for sale you can just purchase it & get them to post it to your address. The only stipulation is that you do not "use" it. That means that by law you are not allowed to fire it, & it must be secured in a gun safe when it is not under your control. Antique is defined as being made before 1901.

Pistol 2.jpg
This is the pistol I purchased.
Keith.
 

theslothman

Russell Coight
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Hi keith. Thanks for the reply and info mate. I had No idea about this. Im very interested and will look into one. Its a shame they cant be displayed on a wall or in a case with some accompanying kit.

Cheers
Ian / Sloth
 
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