Aboriginal Scarred Trees - Bark Canoes etc

Aussie123

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Here is a link to a pdf about Aboriginal Scarred Trees.

I was browsing a book, just this week on this very topic and I put it down and walked out of the shop at the last minute and have been tossing up weather to return to buy it.

Then I found this pdf which I have not fully read as yet :

http://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/resources/cultureheritage/ScarredTreeManual.pdf

The book has much more detail, but this is a great reference.
A couple of things which greatly surprised me are the clear hand and toe holds on some trees, and the fact that some of the bark sheets removed were very high off the ground.

Harvesting a high up sheet suggests to me that there may have been a lack of suitable resources in the area ie all the really good bark sheets (for canoes) had been used up - after all, I'm sure they would use the easy to get ones first and only go to extreme measured because they have to.

The other aspect of this is that they obviously had the skill and ability to harvest these high up sheets, which are bulky and heavy, and to safely get them to the ground. Once again, you're not going to go to all that trouble and danger unless you are reasonable confident you will succeed - or perhaps you are just that desperate ?

I’m not sure that I would be able to accomplish a feat like that ?
 

Aussie123

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koalaboi

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Just recently a traditional watercraft workshop/conference was held in Sydney. A mate of mine was a participant. He and a couple of others made a canoe from a big piece of blackbut bark. It was their third attempt and it turned out an absolute beauty taking one day to construct.

They have the canoe on display at Foster library (mid north coast of NSW).

Steve said it was really stable.

They will continue to work on improved construction techniques as well as monitor the scarring on the tree.

KB
 

Aussie123

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Interesting stuff Aussie.

Seeing as how Radiata Pine, as seen in commercial pine plantations and state forests all over populated Australia, is a north American species, commonly known over there as Monterey Pine, I thought I'd see what sort of uses the native Americans had for it...



Source: http://www.gardenguides.com/taxonomy/monterey-pine-pinus-radiata/

I always considered pine forests virtual wastelands, apart from the odd roo or wobbly, but now I can approach them with a greater understanding.
Thanks for that. I have Radiata Pine Bark on my "list". I've read of a few folk who cook and eat it. I just need to be passing a pine plantation while its being harvested ...


Just recently a traditional watercraft workshop/conference was held in Sydney. A mate of mine was a participant. He and a couple of others made a canoe from a big piece of blackbut bark. It was their third attempt and it turned out an absolute beauty taking one day to construct.

They have the canoe on display at Foster library (mid north coast of NSW).

Steve said it was really stable.

They will continue to work on improved construction techniques as well as monitor the scarring on the tree.

KB
That sounds very interesting. Are any pictures or info available ?
 
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