A quick bark tinder bundle

Aussie123

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I was passing a fallen stringy bark branch
20181021_132819 (Medium).jpg

I stopped and peeled off some of the inner bark (ie discarded the outer, grey stuff).
This is only a small amount, adequate for a quick light up, but a bigger handful would probably have been prudent if I really needed a fire:
20181021_132847 (Medium).jpg

I folded it up and rolled it into a "cigar" between mt palms, breaking up the fibers and discarding any hard "lumps":
20181021_132901 (Medium).jpg 20181021_132952 (Medium).jpg

The rolled it into a ball, further breaking it up:
20181021_133053 (Medium).jpg

I love cargo pockets. Stored for later use.
Its been raining heavily for a day or, two, but this is perfectly dry (i.e. the inner bark) :
20181021_133157 (Medium).jpg

A few blasts from the fire steel:
20181021_142025 (Medium).jpg
 

wildnfree

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Nice work. I think you should store more for later uses.
 

Le Loup

John McDouall Stuart
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I was passing a fallen stringy bark branch
View attachment 25517

I stopped and peeled off some of the inner bark (ie discarded the outer, grey stuff).
This is only a small amount, adequate for a quick light up, but a bigger handful would probably have been prudent if I really needed a fire:
View attachment 25518

Previously posted on this forum at: https://bushcraftoz.com/forums/group.php?discussionid=210&do=discuss

I folded it up and rolled it into a "cigar" between mt palms, breaking up the fibers and discarding any hard "lumps":
View attachment 25519 View attachment 25520

The rolled it into a ball, further breaking it up:
View attachment 25521

I love cargo pockets. Stored for later use.
Its been raining heavily for a day or, two, but this is perfectly dry (i.e. the inner bark) :
View attachment 25522

A few blasts from the fire steel:
View attachment 25523
The best part to use is the outer bark from a Stringybark tree, live or dead. It will not damage the tree. Even in the rain this is a good source of dry kindling.
Keith.
[video=youtube_share;N9NWSJv2EGQ]https://youtu.be/N9NWSJv2EGQ[/video]
Previously posted on this forum at: https://bushcraftoz.com/forums/group.php?
discussionid=210&do=discuss

And: https://bushcraftoz.com/forums/showthread.php?9030-A-Woodsrunner-s-Day-Part-One
No comments recieved on either post.
 

Le Loup

John McDouall Stuart
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i find that when i try process it,
the bark just breaks up and crumbles away,

am i rolling it between my palms too much?
Could be PM, or maybe you are using a different type of stringybark. I think we have mostly grey stringy here, but there is a red stringybark too.
Keith.
 

Wentworth

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Nice one Aussie. I need to sort out a pouch for gathering stringy bark. I've just been stuffing it in the side pocket of the pack and making a mess!
 

Le Loup

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i find that when i try process it,
the bark just breaks up and crumbles away,

am i rolling it between my palms too much?
This morning I was thinking about this, you know how it is when someone asks you something & you are so used to doing it that you can't actually remember how you did it. Well I don't rub or roll it between my hands, I grip each end & then move my hands like feet on a bicycle. Not too much, just enough to break up the fibres. In an area where there is a lot of Stringybark I don't bother to carry it, rain or shine it is always there for use.
Keith.
The Outer Bark of the Stringybark Tree makes good Kindling..jpg
 

Chigger

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Here is some stringybark I scrunched up prior to lighting a fire, think it is red stringybark ? Sometimes carry some in a plastic bag in case of bad weather.

Stringybark Flint and Steel RESIZED.jpg

Where I am stringybark is about but not prolific which is why I keep some with me on bushwalks.
 
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Aussie123

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i find that when i try process it,
the bark just breaks up and crumbles away,

am i rolling it between my palms too much?
There are definitely a few different "stringy" barks about.

You can't roll it too much, or too hard. You can't over-process it !

What I have noticed is that the outer bark will tend to turn to powder more readily than the inner layers (which tend to be more stringy).

Also the bark on the main trunk tends to be thicker, and powder more than on branches (perhaps because trunk bark is older ?)

So look for a fallen branch where you can get to the inner layers.
You may need to try trees in a different area, but once you have find one which works, you'll know what you are looking for

Good luck !
 
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Le Loup

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Here is some stringybark I scrunched up prior to lighting a fire, think it is red stringybark ? Sometimes carry some in a plastic bag in case of bad weather.

View attachment 25573

Where I am stringybark is about but not prolific which is why I keep some with me on bushwalks.
As Aussie says, there are more types of stringybarks than you can shake a stick at!
Keith.
 

Aussie123

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Here is some stringybark I scrunched up prior to lighting a fire, think it is red stringybark ? Sometimes carry some in a plastic bag in case of bad weather.

View attachment 25573

Where I am stringybark is about but not prolific which is why I keep some with me on bushwalks.
This bark looks more "powdery" that the bark I pictured; I can see that it has broken into short fibers where it has been processed, whereas the bark I had remained long and stringy.
This bark should light, but rubbing it too much will turn it to powder, so perhaps you can fluff it up too much in spite of my earlier comments !

I'm not sure, but the bark does look like its outer bark, rather than inner ?

I know I would struggle to light it with a flint and steel unless there is some char-cloth etc being used, but a modern firesteel (or a match) will light it directly.


PS - The powder will act like a fire inhibitor, so discard it and let it fall through your fingers, the fibers are what you want.

PPS - while you are experimenting, you should put a match to it, just to see how well it burns. If you can't light it with a match, you'll never light it by flint and steel or firesteel
 

Le Loup

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This bark looks more "powdery" that the bark I pictured; I can see that it has broken into short fibers where it has been processed, whereas the bark I had remained long and stringy.
This bark should light, but rubbing it too much will turn it to powder, so perhaps you can fluff it up too much in spite of my earlier comments !

I'm not sure, but the bark does look like its outer bark, rather than inner ?

I know I would struggle to light it with a flint and steel unless there is some char-cloth etc being used, but a modern firesteel (or a match) will light it directly.


PS - The powder will act like a fire inhibitor, so discard it and let it fall through your fingers, the fibers are what you want.

PPS - while you are experimenting, you should put a match to it, just to see how well it burns. If you can't light it with a match, you'll never light it by flint and steel or firesteel
Definitely no good as tinder, the outer bark is for use as kindling. The inner bark can be used as tinder once prepared correctly. I never use charred cloth, not much of it about in the bush!
Keith.
 

Aussie123

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While walking yesterday I went passed a tree and having just commented on this thread back tracked and snapped a few photos.

The tree was dead and the bark was starting to lift around a damaged section.

I could look inside and see the inner bark.
Very fibrous and stringy, I've done no processing, just grabbing it with my fingers:
20181202_170045 (Medium).jpg 20181202_170147 (Medium).jpg

Its just like jute ! I rolled it up a bit, but really no prep was needed:
20181202_170300 (Medium).jpg

The outer bark of the same bit of tree:
20181202_170052 (Medium).jpg

Crushing and rolling forms very short fibers and lots of dust.
20181202_170059 (Medium).jpg 20181202_170131 (Medium).jpg

This is literally the same spot on the tree, just the inner and outer bark.
 

Le Loup

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While walking yesterday I went passed a tree and having just commented on this thread back tracked and snapped a few photos.

The tree was dead and the bark was starting to lift around a damaged section.

I could look inside and see the inner bark.
Very fibrous and stringy, I've done no processing, just grabbing it with my fingers:
View attachment 25574 View attachment 25578

Its just like jute ! I rolled it up a bit, but really no prep was needed:
View attachment 25579

The outer bark of the same bit of tree:
View attachment 25575

Crushing and rolling forms very short fibers and lots of dust.
View attachment 25576 View attachment 25577

This is literally the same spot on the tree, just the inner and outer bark.
Mate I have never had this bark do that, live tree or dead. I even keep some in the wood box in case the fire in the stove in the house should go out & need re lighting. But the bark on the tree in your image is not like the Stringybark that I use for kindling, though we do have some like that.
Grass Tree 2 CROPPED.jpgDifferent-Stringybark.jpg
The Stringy I use on the left, your'e Stringy on the right. Can you see the difference?
Keith.
 

Aussie123

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Mate I have never had this bark do that, live tree or dead. I even keep some in the wood box in case the fire in the stove in the house should go out & need re lighting. But the bark on the tree in your image is not like the Stringybark that I use for kindling, though we do have some like that.
View attachment 25580View attachment 25581
The Stringy I use on the left, your'e Stringy on the right. Can you see the difference?
Keith.

Hi Keith,

You are correct. I don't think the tree I pictured here (Quoted) is a "StringyBark", I think its a Long Leaved Box which are common in the area (along with a few other species including Red Stringybark)
The tree was dead standing with no leaves etc, so a bit hard to be sure.

But it did illustrate the difference between the inner and outer bark, (as per the comments from Chigger and the original post), and that's the point I was trying to show ...

In this case the inner bark fibers have been exposed for some time and the retting process had started to separate the fibers; I have seen "similar" in the past (and I think I've posted pics here from time to time in the past), but this was quite an exceptional example (and timely) so I back tracked and snapped the pictures.

In my original post the branch was fresh and I had to peel the inner bark before I could break it up to produce some nice fibers.

As you know the fibers are good for cordage too hence the name Stringy-bark
 

Chigger

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Think some have misread what I showed in the photo. The bark in the photo was used with a tinderbox loaded with charred fungi as a puck. This puck takes a spark very easily and just about any dry tinder will ignite when the puck is glowing.

Apart from the crunched up bark shown have found dried eucalytus leaves ignite when put to the glowing puck. Lot of smoke though.
 
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Le Loup

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Think some have misread what I showed in the photo. The bark in the photo was used with a tinderbox loaded with charred fungi as a puck. This puck takes a spark very easily and just about any dry tinder will ignite when the puck is glowing.

Apart from the crunched up bark shown have found dried eucalytus leaves ignite when put to the glowing puck. Lot of smoke though.
Changing original names & meanings of original names can get very confusing. I have never heard of the term "puck" being used to mean tinder, though it may be a new invented term, & tree bark is not tinder it is kindling.
I hope you don't think I am being a smart ass here, I am not trying to be, but as you quite correctly implied Chigger, misread comments lead to confusion.
Regards, Keith.

Definition of Puck.
1.
a black disc made of hard rubber, used in ice hockey.
2.
COMPUTING
an input device resembling a mouse, dragged across a mat which senses its position to move the cursor on the screen.
 

Aussie123

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"Fire Puck" is a commercial product for fire starting.

I think its a form of compressed tinder which will take a spark ... (?)

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