Best locations to Live in? (food abundance)???

stringbean

Russell Coight
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Hello,

I wrote out a big post and then lost it so I will just post the gist of it and clarify any questions you have.

I want to try and 'live in the bush' as the saying goes. Because I want to be in nature. I originally wanted to buy an acreage and homestead but I can't afford it and I am going to quit my job as it is a very dehumanizing job and I just can't stick it out any longer. So my only second choice then is to go and live in the actual bush...

...But my main concern is finding a spot that is relatively easy to actually live in (I'm talking about sustaining myself with food). so my question is what are some of the best places that have the most amount of food (such as wild edible plants and weeds, fishing spots, possible hunting spots) where you can actually thrive and not just barely survive ya know? Thanks for that, you can PM me if you want.

Now I don't actually have much survival experience but my goal was to first find the best locations that meet my criteria of an abundance of food, and then I was gonna hire one of the survival trainers to show me everything I need in that actual location so it will be very specific to my needs.

As I said, I will clarify anything you need. And I might post more info later, I just don't like spending much time on the computer as it hurts my eyes.

thanks for any help.
 

Le Loup

John McDouall Stuart
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Hello,

I wrote out a big post and then lost it so I will just post the gist of it and clarify any questions you have.

I want to try and 'live in the bush' as the saying goes. Because I want to be in nature. I originally wanted to buy an acreage and homestead but I can't afford it and I am going to quit my job as it is a very dehumanizing job and I just can't stick it out any longer. So my only second choice then is to go and live in the actual bush...

...But my main concern is finding a spot that is relatively easy to actually live in (I'm talking about sustaining myself with food). so my question is what are some of the best places that have the most amount of food (such as wild edible plants and weeds, fishing spots, possible hunting spots) where you can actually thrive and not just barely survive ya know? Thanks for that, you can PM me if you want.

Now I don't actually have much survival experience but my goal was to first find the best locations that meet my criteria of an abundance of food, and then I was gonna hire one of the survival trainers to show me everything I need in that actual location so it will be very specific to my needs.

As I said, I will clarify anything you need. And I might post more info later, I just don't like spending much time on the computer as it hurts my eyes.

thanks for any help.
This has a bit of a catch 22 stringbean, in so much as this is as much about survival as it is bushcraft, & the best place for living off the land may not be the best place as comfort is concerned, or in fact long term survival considering the effects of global warming.

Two areas come to mind in regards to wild edible plants, one is Arnhem Land, where I spent some time living on the Aboriginal Reserve some years ago, & the other is Queensland. The problem is that wherever there are people & live stock the environment will be depleted of native edible plants. Arnhem land is a better proposition in that regard, but it is hot there & it will be getting hotter! Also it is very isolated.

The days in Australia when you could just go bush & survive have pretty much gone mate. I own land, & I have been living off grid for over 40 years now. We supply all our own needs including electricity & water, & we grow our own food. Even so, global warming is having an effect here in New England NSW, & we are having to add more & more shade to our garden to stop the heat from killing the plants. Our big dam has so far not recovered from last summer & is very low.

Given that you probably can't afford to purchase land, the only practicle solution I can think of at present is trying to join an off grid community. You need to be able to grow your own food. In a shtf scenario this could be done by simply going deep into one of the national parks with all the right (primitive equipment) gear & a heap of vegie seeds & setting up camp somewhere, but right now i don't see this as a viable solution.

Another option might be a job as a caretaker on a property out of town, or even low rent of a place out of town.

If I can be of any assistance with skills & equipment SB, just let me know.
Regards, Keith.
 

stringbean

Russell Coight
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Thanks for the reply, Le Loup. Well that isn't very good then is it haha. Do you have an opinion on Tasmania? I didn't realize that the climate change was so bad to be honest.

I just found out forigners can buy land in South Africa, and its pretty cheap. hmm:^o): will have to research more into that.
 

koalaboi

Mors Kochanski
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Hi,

Prior to European invasion, the densest populations of people in Australia were along the east coast. It's the same since invasion and the reasons are pretty obvious: much more fresh water and a moderate climate. With the extra water came more bush foods.

Living for 2 years in PNG we never had problems with being cold: didn't need hot showers etc. Adjusting behavior to stay out of the midday sun (where only mad dogs and Englishmen go), was important. You could sit down anywhere at any time and never get a cold bum. Shorts and T shirts the only items of clothing we needed. the point is that living in a warm climate makes a lot of things easy.

The easiest place to gather bush foods is in the inter-tidal zone. So somewhere close the coast.

Another thing about a warm climate is how easy it is to grow food: you don't really need to store too many seeds (not easy in humid environments) because most things are grown from cuttings.

KB
 
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Le Loup

John McDouall Stuart
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I strongly recommend you stay out of South Africa, not a healthy place to be, especially if you are white.

Tasmania has a good climate I understand, never been there. I did hear that there was a lot of unexplored land still there, so it could be a possibility stringbean.
Keith.
 

stringbean

Russell Coight
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Hi,

Prior to European invasion, the densest populations of people in Australia were along the east coast. It's the same since invasion and the reasons are pretty obvious: much more fresh water and a moderate climate. With the extra water came more bush foods.

Living for 2 years in PNG we never had problems with being cold: didn't need hot showers etc. Adjusting behavior to stay out of the midday sun (where only mad dogs and Englishmen go), was important. You could sit down anywhere at any time and never get a cold bum. Shorts and T shirts the only items of clothing we needed. the point is that living in a warm climate makes a lot of things easy.

The easiest place to gather bush foods is in the inter-tidal zone. So somewhere close the coast.

Another thing about a warm climate is how easy it is to grow food: you don't really need to store too many seeds (not easy in humid environments) because most things are grown from cuttings.

KB

Thanks for that information, that is interesting. I noticed that one of the Bush Survival trainers who offer 1 on 1 mentoring say that they conduct most of their training in the Jervise bay NSW which seems to be similar to what you are describing.

I will most likely call them and ask them if they think its do-able to live forever in the area.

Maybe find somewhere local and see if you can survive a night, then a few days, then a week etc
I have gone no-frills camping many times with nothing but my clothes and water, But I have never found any decent bushfood (granted, I have not had training in identifying and locating it) to allow me to live there comfortably. It always just ended up me not eating for 2 or 3 days. But that wasn't really as a survival thing, just something where I can spend the time in nature away from it all. I live in South Australia btw. other than that, I can comfortably stay in the bush and I love the ruggedness, its just a matter of me getting enough food so I can actually sustain myself.
I strongly recommend you stay out of South Africa, not a healthy place to be, especially if you are white.

Tasmania has a good climate I understand, never been there. I did hear that there was a lot of unexplored land still there, so it could be a possibility stringbean.
Keith.
yeah your probably correct, I didn't really think about that issue when I posted that. haha

I will probably ask the survival trainers what they think of Tasmania. its just that unless they have spent time there themselves they can't really comment much on it. and most of these trainers seem to be in nsw or qld



I know this is an Aussie forum, but does anyone know of any places in the world that is reputed to being very easy to go bush in? (the worlds a big place so surely theres a place that just spits out bushfoods for the taking). I tried looking for secluded acreages in America but most still are out of my price range, and it seems like its not even as easy as just moving there, you gotta jump thru hoops. So now i'm thinking of just going there for a holiday then just dropping off the radar lol
 

Bloffy13

Jon Muir
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Try SE Asia. Cost of living is cheap as far as I know.
To be honest, and not knowing you or your skill sets, I think it would be hard to live in the bush alone for extended periods of time. People can survive but few thrive alone. Even indigenous people relied heavily on having a family, a tribe or other social structure to live in the Australian bush and they had countless generations of experience to draw upon.
Think hunting skills (both large and small animals), gathering skills (knowing the foods, where they grow, when they fruit etc) tool making and maintenance (even simple things like keeping knives sharp, carving bowls, keeping and maintaing the likes of digging implements etc), water procurement, fire making and keeping it going etc (collecting firewood, maintaining a fire so it doesn't go out overnight etc) . Building shelters which are suitable for climate etc.
Dave Canterbury said "Anyone can rough it. I am all about smoothing it".
If your job sucks, get another one that better suits your interests, your skill sets and abilities. I have and I love my job. It might take time but it's worth the hunt. In the interim, keep looking. You never know what will come your way. All advice given comes from experience not expertise. Lol
Cheers
Bloffy
 

Le Loup

John McDouall Stuart
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Hello,

I wrote out a big post and then lost it so I will just post the gist of it and clarify any questions you have.

I want to try and 'live in the bush' as the saying goes. Because I want to be in nature. I originally wanted to buy an acreage and homestead but I can't afford it and I am going to quit my job as it is a very dehumanizing job and I just can't stick it out any longer. So my only second choice then is to go and live in the actual bush...

...But my main concern is finding a spot that is relatively easy to actually live in (I'm talking about sustaining myself with food). so my question is what are some of the best places that have the most amount of food (such as wild edible plants and weeds, fishing spots, possible hunting spots) where you can actually thrive and not just barely survive ya know? Thanks for that, you can PM me if you want.

Now I don't actually have much survival experience but my goal was to first find the best locations that meet my criteria of an abundance of food, and then I was gonna hire one of the survival trainers to show me everything I need in that actual location so it will be very specific to my needs.

As I said, I will clarify anything you need. And I might post more info later, I just don't like spending much time on the computer as it hurts my eyes.

thanks for any help.
There are a series of videos on my channel that you might be interested in stringbean: https://www.youtube.com/user/historicaltrekking/videos?view_as=subscriber
If you have any questions or need any help, contact me.
Regards, Keith.
 

Randall

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The world isn't what it used to be. I believe our population is the problem, of course. What there is left of the natural world, flora and fauna, really should be left alone. We can't all go around lighting fires to cook, or take a dump behind a tree. Although I've seen places where that still happens and I just want to be somewhere else. What wildlife is left should be left alone. Unless you're talking vermin - rabbits, camels, donkeys, pigs, lots of different birds (all in Aust.). I did live on donkey in the Kimberley ranges, and supplemented my diet with grown vegetables for a while. Mostly smoked the meat. I came across this on youtube - a couple doing that in NZ. It sounds as though they hunt and eat pig and rabbit but supplement that with some minimal bought things: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PHf5p19-Cys
 

barefoot dave

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G'day stringbean and welcome. It sounds like you are having a tough time of it and I feel for you.
First, some unwelcome news; if you are planning this transition in less than 12 months then you are planning a slow suicide. The skills needed to be successful in what you propose will take years to acquire. Then there is plain bad luck; a slip trip or bite can quickly mean the end of you. As suggested, give rural caretaking a go. You will pick up skills and become more attuned to the environment. Do heaps of training, watch every video by Le Loup, primitive technology, Walking softly with KOA. Watch them again then practice everything contained 5 times.
You might encounter hesitation on the part of a trainer if you tell them you are planning to drop out.
Mate, the other replies have been gentle, but I am one of those that would be out there searching for you with the Ses. I have seen thousand of hours spent looking for people who go of woefully underprepared. We are also the ones who have to deal with your distraught relatives.
I wish you all the best and a better future. Dave
 

Le Loup

John McDouall Stuart
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Hello,

I wrote out a big post and then lost it so I will just post the gist of it and clarify any questions you have.

I want to try and 'live in the bush' as the saying goes. Because I want to be in nature. I originally wanted to buy an acreage and homestead but I can't afford it and I am going to quit my job as it is a very dehumanizing job and I just can't stick it out any longer. So my only second choice then is to go and live in the actual bush...

...But my main concern is finding a spot that is relatively easy to actually live in (I'm talking about sustaining myself with food). so my question is what are some of the best places that have the most amount of food (such as wild edible plants and weeds, fishing spots, possible hunting spots) where you can actually thrive and not just barely survive ya know? Thanks for that, you can PM me if you want.

Now I don't actually have much survival experience but my goal was to first find the best locations that meet my criteria of an abundance of food, and then I was gonna hire one of the survival trainers to show me everything I need in that actual location so it will be very specific to my needs.

As I said, I will clarify anything you need. And I might post more info later, I just don't like spending much time on the computer as it hurts my eyes.

thanks for any help.
Winter is closer now SB, so now is not a good time to make your move. There is scant edible flora to find in summer & even less in winter.

Dave is right, there is a lot to learn before you make this sort of move. Your equipment needs to be sustainable, this is NOT bushcraft stuff for the most part. You do not need modern gadgets/tools, you need old & tried equipment that will not let you down. Take this time to learn & practice primitive skills & get some gear together. Knowing what to carry with you & knowing which skills to learn are very important. I can post a list of skills that we practice here, & a list of the equipment we carry. These lists are historical, & based on what is needed for long term wilderness living. Much of it is for comfort/ease of living. I could go into the bush with nothing & survive, but that would be living a stone age lifestyle like the Australian Aboriginals, & that is hard work & rough living.

Some of these skills such as Brain Tanning animal skins you may not consider appropriate to your situation. You & I have no idea at this point in time where you will be going & what your situation will be, so bare that in mind when looking at these lists. If nothing else it will give you some idea of just what is required in a long term wilderness living situation. If you have any questions, just ask, no problem.
Keith.

I decided to post this because when I read lists of other people’s modern equipment for bugging out I often see items that I can’t make sense of. Items that are NOT sustainable & seem of very little use (for me). Some say “well I use this until it breaks & then I throw it away”. The problem with that is that this equipment has taken up room, added weight to the pack, can leave sign to track you by if you don’t dispose of it properly, & meanwhile you could have used this space & weight to either carry a better piece of equipment, or you could have left it out & saved room & weight. If you can afford to throw it away, then you don’t need it in the first place.
Anyway, here is my list. Please feel free to comment, different people sometimes see things in a different way & I like to hear other people’s point of view.
My Equipment List. WHAT & WHY.
.62 cal/20 gauge flintlock fusil. 42 inch barrel.
Why? Large calibre smoothbore has a lot of knock down power with a round ball, very versatile using bird shot, buckshot, or round ball or a combination of any two of these, able to use other projectiles found in nature, only requires a siliceous rock for ignition which can be found in nature, the lock is easy to repair, if the lock should break & there are no spare parts I can use it as a matchlock or tinderlock & keep using it, I can use the lock to make fire without the use of gunpowder, I can make my own black powder, I can retrieve spent lead from shot game & reuse it, I can mould my own round ball & shot.
.70 caliber smoothbore flintlock pistol.
Why? Same as above fusil, light to carry, easy to use, good for a back-up & self defence.
Gun tools and spare lock parts.
Why? To keep my firearms working long term.
Shot pouch and contents.
Why? For maintaining & using my firearms.
Leather drawstring pouch of .60 caliber ball (in knapsack).
Why? Back-up supply.
Powder horn.
Why? For carrying gunpowder for immediate use with firearms.
Ball mould, swan shot mould & Lead ladle.
Why? So I can reuse spent lead by remoulding.
5 Gunpowder wallets.
Why? For carrying extra gunpowder, the leather wallet is lighter than a powder horn, once empty they are good for storing spare tinder for fire lighting.
Butcher/Hunting knife.
Why? A good basic working knife made for skinning & butchering game, good self defence knife, long blade but light to carry & use.
Legging knife.
Why? Good back-up knife for hunting & self defence, easy to access, light to use & carry.
Clasp knife.
Why? Good back-up knife, mainly used for camp chores, making kettle hooks, making trap parts, easy to carry.
Tomahawk.
Why? Lighter than a modern hatchet, the helve fits in a round or oval eye & is easy to make in a wilderness situation, the helve can easily be removed to use the head on its own for making a new helve or scraping hides for making leather or rawhide, good for trap making, good for hammering, can be thrown for hunting, defence, offence & entertainment.
Fire bag.
Why? Greased leather waterproof bag for keeping my tinderbox & contents dry.
Tinderbox.
Why? For preparing plant & fungi tinders for flint & steel fire lighting, contains prepared tinder for fire lighting, is used for fire lighting by striking sparks into the tinderbox.
Flint & Steel.
Why? For making fire. This method is sustainable long term.
Belt pouch.
Why? This pouch is carried on the waist belt at all times & contains my fire bag, my fishing tackle container, my sundial compass & my fire steel/striker which is tied to the pouch buckle.
Fishing tackle in brass container.
Why? For fishing & for trapping fowl.
Two brass snares.
Why? Small game snares for trapping .
Roll of brass snare wire.
Spare wire for making small game snares, can be used for making leaders for angling, can be used for repair work.
Knapsack.
Main pack for carrying equipment & food supplies, carries my blanket roll & oil cloth shelter & secures my market wallet.
Scrip.
Why? This haversack is carried just for foraging purposes. I often forage along the trail when trekking.
Market Wallet.
Why? This is secured under the flap closure of my knapsack & is used to carry extra items. This wallet can also be carried over my shoulder.
Tin Cup.
Why? For drinking tea & eating food.
Kettle (Billy Can).
Why? For boiling water for sterilising , making tea, & for cooking.
Water filter bags (cotton & linen bags).
Why? For filtering dirty drinking water before boiling, light & compact & easy to carry, unbreakable.
Medical pouch.
Why? Contains medical equipment & supplies, lighter than a hard container, easy to pack & carry in my knapsack near the top.
Housewife.
Why? This is my sewing kit for making repairs to clothing, making moccasins, needles can be used to remove splinters & if necessary to stitch wounds.
Piece of soap and a broken ivory comb.
Why? For bathing & looking after my hair.
Dried foods in bags.
Why? Dried foods are lighter to carry, easy to pack & preserve well for long periods.
Wooden spoon.
Why? For cooking & eating, light to carry.
Compass.
Why? A compass makes it easier to tell direction on very overcast days & nights, makes it easier to maintain a straight direction & travel quicker.
Whet stone.
Why? For keeping my blades sharp, for working on gun lock parts if needed.
Small metal file.
Why? Same as whet stone above.
Oilcloth.
Why? The oil cloth is for making a quick shelter, easy to set up & versatile, enables me to use a fire for cooking & warmth close to my bed, can be used as a rain coat, can be used for water collection, can be used to make a boat, gives me more vision around me & an easy exit if needed.
One pure wool blanket (Monmouth cap, spare wool waistcoat and wool shirt rolled inside blanket).
Why? The blanket roll is easy to carry, does not restrict my movement/escape at night like a sleeping bag will, can be used as a matchcoat, can be used as a Great Coat, retains body warmth even when wet, light to carry.
Spare pair of moccasins.
Why? To wear if my other pair get wet, to wear whilst I make repairs on the other pair, to wear if the other moccasins need replacing & whilst I make a new pair.
Two water canteens.
Why? For carrying drinking water.
Bottle of rum.
Why? Only a small bottle but I like a tot of rum & it helps me relax a little.

Woodsrunner’s Skills.
New England Colonial Living History Group 1680-1760.
This is a list of basic skills in which we expect an 18th century woodsman or woods-woman to have some experience with in our group. There is no time limit set, learn in your own time & if we can help just ask.
Keith.
• Flint & steel fire lighting
• Wet weather fire lighting
• Fire-bow fire lighting
• Flintlock fire lighting
• Flintlock use, service & repair
• Marksmanship with either gun or bow.
• Field dressing & butchering game
• Blade sharpening
• Tomahawk throwing
• Making rawhide
• Brain tanning
• Primitive shelter construction
• How to stay warm in winter with only one blanket
• Cordage manufacture
• Moccasin construction and repair
• Sewing
• Axe and tomahawk helve making
• Fishing
• Hunting
• Evasion
• Tracking
• Reading sign
• Woods lore
• Navigation
• Primitive trap construction & trapping
• Open fire cooking
• Fireplace construction
• Clothing manufacture
• Drying meat & other foods
• Knowledge of plant tinders & preparation
• Knowledge of native foods & preparation
• Knowledge of native plants in the area and their uses for other than tinder and food.
• Scouting/Ranging.
• Basic first aid.
• Finding and treating water.
• General leather work.

This supplies list is not mine, but I thought you might find it interesting. This will of course be supplemented with any game that can be hunted. As you will see, this is a lot of food. Without this food you will be trapping, hunting & foraging pretty much full time. If you were to grow your own food, then this would reduce the work load enormously. I lived 6 years off grid in the Territory growing our own food & hunting. I did the same here in New England for 20 years. We are still off grid & growing our own food but I no longer have to hunt to put meat on the table. We eat very little meat plus we keep chooks & ducks for both eggs & meat.

Survival supplies list Alaska. A starting point for one’s own list.
A More Complete Supply List

After my experiences the first two winters, I composed the following list. This is for one man for five to six months. It was refined for my personal taste and needs in the Alaska bush. The old trapper that I got my first list from made do with a lot less than what I took. This list is tried and true and not a just theory that someone made up. I had around 200 traps and ran the line on snowshoes, foot and skis. Cut my firewood by hand (no chain saw) and hauled my water from the lake in buckets. It was hard work 12-15 hours a day 7 days a week and I burned a lot of calories. Using the following list I ate well and always had plenty of supplies left in the spring:
50 lbs Flour
50 lbs Bisquick
25 lbs Pancake mix
35 lbs Sugar
50 lbs Pinto Beans
25 lbs Rice
40 lbs Salt pork
25 lbs Salt
10 lbs Dried prunes
10 lbs Raisons
10 lbs Dried apricots
10 lbs Dried apples
10 lbs Dried peaches
25 lbs Oatmeal
10 lbs Honey
2 cases Tomato paste
25 lbs powdered milk
15 lbs [canned] Butter
25 lbs Corn meal
25 lbs [canned] Cheese
20 lbs Spaghetti Noodles
10 lbs Crisco
15 lbs Hot cocoa mix
10 lbs Dried eggs
5 lbs Strawberry Jam
3 lbs Apricot Jam
2 boxes Pilot bread
1 gal Maple Syrup
180 Multi vitamins
180 Vitamin C
1 lb [powdered dry] Yeast
180 Tea bags
1 lbs Pepper
1 lbs
Baking soda
8 lbs
Dried onions
1 lb Baking powder
1 lb. Corn starch
24 oz Garlic powder
12 oz Vanilla
2 rolls aluminum foil
1/2 gal Dish soap
5 bars non-scented soap
36 Canning lids (to can meat if we had a winter thaw or for leftover in the spring)
8 oz Hydrogen peroxide
2 oz Iodine
12 rolls Toilet paper
2 Small sponges
2 Scrub pads
1 roll Duct Tape
4 boxes of wooden Matches
24 Plumber’s candles
500 rounds .22 long rifle hollow point ammo
100 .308 ammo 125 grain hollow point varmint ammo
20 rounds .308 ammo 180 grain (for Moose or Caribou )
Trapping license and regulations
Hunting license, moose tags and caribou tags
New snowshoe bindings
1 truck inner tube
3 New hacksaw blades
2 New Ax handles
8 Bow saw blades
36 oz Lanolin
6 Disposable lighters
12 gal White gas [aka Coleman Fuel]
12 Lantern mantels
6 oz. Gun oil
Trapping Lures, urine and musk
10 lbs Trap wax
2 rolls Survey [“flagging”] tape
1 pair Heavy Neoprene trapping gloves
7 lbs Trapping wire( 50% 12 ga and 50% 14 ga)
50 ft Trap Chain #2 and #3
24 Links
24 Swivels
AM Radio with 8 extra 9 volt batteries
8’ New stove pipe for cabin stove
4 Leather awl needles and 50’ waxed thread
Extra shoulder straps for pack frame
Extra hip belt for pack
New lid for fry pan 14”
100’ – 3/8 nylon rope
12×18” glass to replace cracked window
Personal items
1 Wool Jacket
2 Wool pants
2 Work pants
1 Pair insulated Carhartt coveralls
4 Pair work gloves
2 Pair heavy winter over mittens.
Winter trappers hat
1 pair
Pack boots with 2 sets liners
1 pair Bunny Boots
1 Wool sweater
4 pair long sleeved wool shirts
3 pair Wool long john pants
3 pair Wool long john shirts
8 pair Wool socks
8 pair Cotton socks
6 pair Underpants
1 Bible
2 flying ground school books
6 Short sleeve Cotton shirts
Tooth brush
Tooth powder
2 rolls dental floss
Carried or in an external frame pack:
1 .308 rifle
1 22 pistol (Colt Woodsman)
Rain coat
Rain pants
Insolite sleeping pad
Sleeping bag
10×12’ and 4×8’ light nylon tarps
Flashlight
Flashlight batteries
Binoculars, 10×40
Green River skinning knife, caping knife, boning knife.
Small stone, small file and small diamond steel
Compass
Topo maps 1:250,000 scale
2 Candles
Matches in waterproof container
Lighter
Small cook pot with lid
Water bottle
100’ Parachute cord
Small First aid kit with Large suture needles and suture, in sealed pack
Mini channel locks (Snap-on) used for sutures and other things
Pack repair kit
¾-length Hand ax. (Estwing)
Small shovel
Bow saw with extra blade
1 pair wool socks
Wire snares
Fish hooks and line
25’ .042” stainless wire
1 lb Dried soup mix

This latter list of supplies is of course is being transported in by 4WD vehicle.
 
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