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Thread: Who Likes And Uses Hurricane Lamps..?

  1. #41
    Malcolm Douglas

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    Quote Originally Posted by koalaboi View Post
    Hi,

    I spent 2 years living on a little island just off the coast of Papua New Guinea and of course, electric lighting was a real luxury...we had power for 2 hours per day between 4 and 6pm. This was back in the mid 80s.

    We had to use a hurricane lamp outside those hours. We had a kerosene fridge too so always had kerosene on hand. I found both to be a pain in the arse: the fridge was great when it worked but too often we'd come home from school to find our little house full of soot and the fridge out. The lamp inside the house stank.

    Was never able to fix the fridge so just had to keep pulling it apart and cleaning it every week or so.

    We solved the lighting by picking up some 12volt lights to run from a car cigarette lighter. Ran them from a 12 volt battery which was connected to a charger plugged into the power. Switches on the walls and it was a great set up. It charged up for 2 hours per day and was enough to keep the lights going and our radio.

    Now back In Oz, I go campig and am onto my second Coleman dual fuel pressure lamp. I picked my second one up the other day at a garage sale for $10...it was hardly used at all. I also picked up a great kero pressure lamp some years ago but gave it to a friend...not sure if he still has it.

    My Coleman presssure lamp is the go to lamp for checking out Aboriginal engravings at night. Put the light source down on the rock and hey presto, you'll see stuff that's just not visible in daylight.

    KB
    Interesting living on an island and although I have never used a kerosene fridge knew plenty of farming people of years ago whom did. Kero fridges were a bit of a fire hazard and some houses had a concrete enclosure for where the fridge was located because of this.

    The burners needed regular cleaning as you have noted.

    Many years ago spent a few months in a farm house with no electricity at all. A wood burning stove, hurricane lamps and for quick boiling of water for tea used my Dad's Primus pressure stove.
    Still have the stove which is in working order.

    Coleman lamps are very bright, I use Shellite in mine. (Also have a Coleman dual fuel twin burner stove, the green box one). Best not to put Australian unleaded fuel in them as the generators can be damaged.

    Unleaded fuel sold in Australia has additives which are not good for lamps and stoves.

    Knew a group of 4WD'ers whom made the mistake of putting unleaded fuel in their Coleman dual fuel stoves and they all had to have the generators replaced.

  2. #42
    Mors Kochanski

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    Ta for the reponse.

    Only use shellite in m ine too. I also have an old optimus shellite stove whih needs metho to prime it. This was before trangias. It's much smaller than a trangia and heats up very quickly. Have walked in Australia and PNG with it.

    KB

  3. #43
    Richard Proenneke
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    Quote Originally Posted by koalaboi View Post
    Ta for the reponse.

    Only use shellite in m ine too. I also have an old optimus shellite stove whih needs metho to prime it. This was before trangias. It's much smaller than a trangia and heats up very quickly. Have walked in Australia and PNG with it.

    KB
    Would love to see a photo of that one, maybe we need to start a stoves thread.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  4. #44
    Malcolm Douglas

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    Fished out a couple more of my lamps which were stored away.

    The blue lamp is a Dietz No 10 Monarch hot blast lamp which was more intended as a barn lamp. The other is a very old English Chalwyn Far East model, very rusted and in my youthful enthusiasm slopped silver fros paint all over it.

    Probably one day I will do a proper restoration of it sometime.

    Dietz Monarch and Chalwyn.jpg

  5. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Chigger For This Useful Post:

    Aussie123 (19-07-18),Edward (19-07-18),MongooseDownUnder (21-07-18)

  6. #45
    Russell Coight
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    Hi there. Some nice old lamps here... Koalaboi's story sounds like paradise!

    When you start out using an oil lantern's in the 80's how/ why would you stop??? Such a beautiful ambience indeed- really makes a camp, IMHO.

    Here are two contemporary, but well used, (galvanic) Feuerhand lanterns made in Germany I brought about a year ago, and a stainless steel/brass Miners Protector Lamp I just had to have from England, by Eccles.

    I take 1-3 army green Feuerhand's when car camping, and occasionally 1 when rock, river or jetty fishing.

    I also looked into some early 1950 kero pressure lanterns, hence the Tilley Lamp Book and even brought the washer servicing kits. But I wasn't able to find any good examples at the time and restorations weren't really feasible for the ones I could find.


    Last edited by Edward; 19-07-18 at 11:57 PM.

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    Chigger (20-07-18),MongooseDownUnder (21-07-18),sami12 (20-07-18)

  8. #46
    Malcolm Douglas

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    A hurricane lamp makes a good night fishing light and is cheap to run. Always take one with me on my fishing trips.

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    Edward (22-07-18)

  10. #47
    Russell Coight
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chigger View Post
    A hurricane lamp makes a good night fishing light and is cheap to run. Always take one with me on my fishing trips.

    Agreed Chigger

    I have always been surprised by the run times too. And unlike with an electrical headlamp etc, I know it simply cant fail me and if it does I can probably fix it!

    There is a bit on you tube about enthusiasts making these lamps run more efficiently by trimming wicks, increasing candle power by using thicker wicks and running them on different and cheap natural fuels. Its all good fun I reckon!

    When I brought these new oil lanterns I ran them out the back of my house every Friday and Saturday night. One late afternoon I noticed I hadn't turned one of the darn things off before bed one night. On closer inspection I realised it was still alight, and it still had a third of a tank of gas left in it it!

    As a kid I was also intrigued by those primitive torches you see people like Indiana Jones using in caves, etc. albeit not that practical nor safe.

    Cheers, Edward.
    Last edited by Edward; 22-07-18 at 02:46 AM.

  11. #48
    Malcolm Douglas

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    An occassional brush away the carbon buildup from around the wick and a trim will help to widen the flame out which results in more light output. Did that with my Dietz's a few days back and could see the improvement.

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